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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitPole View Post
    Sorry, Woodbridge no longer makes my list. While it is cute as hell and close to everything cool, I know too many people who have been the victims of serious violent crime there. I think there is a lot of crime of opportunity because the bad guys know there are students, teachers, and profs living there with at least something to steal.
    I had thought Woodbridge was getting better, or at least that's what I hear around town.

    Anyway, remember, there was a time when people wouldn't move to SoHo, let alone the Bowery (now renamed NoLiTa) or the Lower East Side. If you had asked people in 1978 if downtown Manhattan would ever come back, they'd have laughed in your face. Heck, if you had asked Detroiters in 1915 if the development would stretch all the way to Rochester, they may have laughed at you ("What, out in all those beet fields? In the middle of nowhere?)
    I think light rail is going to have a dramatic impact on the parts of town it cuts through. It will either be a real page turner for Detroit resulting in a steady and continued build-up of revitalization, or it will be a complete bust. I'm putting all my eggs in that basket. Light rail could be the one big catalyst, a real game changer.

  2. #27

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    If they wanted to own, there are some units in 1300 Lafayette where the equity is very low and I would expect a young couple could likely swing it. The maintenance tends to be higher than in the townhouses though.

  3. #28

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    A friend of mine who lives in Woodbridge recently had a home invasion and was taken prisoner while the house was ransacked. There's just something about Woodbridge -- maybe the combination of carefree young people and the tough neighborhood just beyond it -- that makes Woodbridge a hot spot for muggings and burglaries.

    Of course, it's good advice no matter where you live: Stay alert and watch your surroundings.

  4. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by socks_mahoney View Post
    a refreshed The Hole Park
    What is Hole Park? I live in Woodbridge and have never heard of it.

  5. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zozo View Post
    What is Hole Park? I live in Woodbridge and have never heard of it.
    Maybe it's a Hole where a park used to be.

  6. #31

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    no! dont tell them about the co-op area east of greek-town. we like the quiet and safe neighborhoods over here.
    LOL.
    I lived in Eastern Market since 1999 and bought a co-op in town square east of Lafayette Towers in 2007.
    Love here! can walk to downtown, eastern market safely. dequinder cut is out my back door.
    yes i do have to drive to bars in cass corridor or wayne state, or can call a cab.

  7. #32

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    Windsor, Ontario

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitPole View Post

    Sorry, Woodbridge no longer makes my list. While it is cute as hell and close to everything cool, I know too many people who have been the victims of serious violent crime there. I think there is a lot of crime of opportunity because the bad guys know there are students, teachers, and profs living there with at least something to steal.


    In my experience, midtown and downtown are very safe - especially Midtown with WSU cops on the prowl and only a phone call away.
    I agree, this is a serious problem. When I lived there I was mugged once and had my home invaded twice. Unfortunately, its usually kids and teenagers from the surrounding neighborhoods...so not only are they hard to catch but they are a bit more jumpy and dangerous. And they are often too young to understand their actions.

    The good news is that Woodbridge residents have recognized that though crime used to be worse in the past (1970's, 1980's) it has definitely been spiking in the neighborhood the past 2-5 years. And they are acting. Starting about two years ago the WSU police committed to patrol the neighborhood on a regular, daily basis and now will respond to calls made to their dispatcher from the neighborhood (this goes for Northend/Henry Ford/South New Center areas as well actually). They got funding for extra police officers just for the purpose of patrolling the neighborhoods that surround WSU/Midtown.

    Another organization is working with the police and AmeriCorps volunteers to restart regular block club meetings (an old fixture in decades past) on every block to visually and culturally close the neighborhood to criminals through neighborhood patrols, home security enhancement, and physical improvements to the neighborhood. It remains to see if it can be done, but with the right organizing and the right coordination with the police its definitely possible.

  9. #34

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    DetroitPole
    I think you misinterpreted my comments, I wasn't calling "them" kids I was talking about the prospect of them having kids and raising kids i.e. children, having kids and then those kids (their children) attending DPS at some point in the future. Also my greater point was, wouldn't it be nice if "families chose to move into and raise a family in Detroit.

    "Eastside, since you invited the arrows...this may not be your intent, but I do find the attitude of "some kids move into the city and then move out when they've grown up" pretty condescending. There is an implication there that these are wide-eyed kids just looking for the thrill of living in the city for a few years and then suddenly one day grab a pair of dockers, a riding lawnmower, a border collie and move to Shelby Township."

  10. #35

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    great topic!

    Im 25 and just got my degree. I've been staying with my mom temporarily but am planning on moving to Detroit as soon as I have the finances to do so. I've been out of work since aug but (fingers crossed) I think I may be getting hired for a job downtown (though it would require travel thru much of the metro.) One criteria is I need to be able to get to my car quickly if I'm on call.

    I'm not sure how unique my story is but I'm actually really torn on this issue. On the one hand I'd love to be close enough to walk or bike downtown for all the fun but on the other hand I'm seriously looking at buying a house at a price we may well never see again.

    I didn't realize things had been getting so bad in woodbridge but that is one spot I'm considering for the reasons others have listed (its really cool that they have a neighborhood bar now!) Woodbridge/midtown would have you in easy biking distance to downtown.

    I've been looking at a few other areas besides woodbridge and midtown:

    East riverfront: lots of rental options and you can't beat the view of the water!

    West Village: the residents here have done a great job promoting this little neighborhood and it shows. It seems to me its already attracted some of the younger and/or new to the city crowd. Some apartments available and terrific houses (plus for people who like to walk theres indian village and belle isle nearby) Personally I think WV/IV pretty soon could support a neighborhood bar like the woodbridge; even if i have to do it myself lol

    Southwest/Hubbard: I'd be curious to see if this is starting to become a popular area for the younger/new to Detroit crowd. SW offers, as mentioned, pretty good retail etc. Hubbard farms reminds me a bit of woodbridge and appears to be doing quite well.

    As for woodward rail I think in a few years this will bring growth to the south new center area and palmer park. This goes double if the detroit-ann arbor rail ever gets done and they keep the stop at the current amtrak station.

    But the flip side is that I'm looking at houses in a handful of areas like rosedale park area, bagley, EEV etc that are stunning values right now at around 20-30k. These are houses that sold for between 100 to 170k a few years back and i don't imagine those prices will last long. (as a side note of course Detroit is lacking transit but everywhere I'm looking is pretty close to a bus line so its nice to have that option to get downtown without having to park etc)

    I bring this up because I imagine some other people are in the same boat: there are some really cool parts of Detroit close to the action to rent but right now they also have the opportunity to own their own house free and clear before they hit 30. I hope we can see more people down the road moving back to the city and stabilizing/rebuilding more neighborhoods. Of course the school situation is a problem but I'm holding out hope that something has to change by the time i have to cross that particular bridge.

  11. #36

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    In my opinion, a person who is not married (or at least in a long-term relationship) and without kids should think twice before buying a house. Mobility is one of the great assets such a person has, and buying a house definitely devalues that asset.

  12. #37

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    Or become a renter later.

  13. #38
    DetroitPole Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by socks_mahoney View Post
    I agree, this is a serious problem. When I lived there I was mugged once and had my home invaded twice. Unfortunately, its usually kids and teenagers from the surrounding neighborhoods...so not only are they hard to catch but they are a bit more jumpy and dangerous. And they are often too young to understand their actions.

    The good news is that Woodbridge residents have recognized that though crime used to be worse in the past (1970's, 1980's) it has definitely been spiking in the neighborhood the past 2-5 years. And they are acting. Starting about two years ago the WSU police committed to patrol the neighborhood on a regular, daily basis and now will respond to calls made to their dispatcher from the neighborhood (this goes for Northend/Henry Ford/South New Center areas as well actually). They got funding for extra police officers just for the purpose of patrolling the neighborhoods that surround WSU/Midtown.

    Another organization is working with the police and AmeriCorps volunteers to restart regular block club meetings (an old fixture in decades past) on every block to visually and culturally close the neighborhood to criminals through neighborhood patrols, home security enhancement, and physical improvements to the neighborhood. It remains to see if it can be done, but with the right organizing and the right coordination with the police its definitely possible.
    This is good news - thanks for sharing.

    Regarding the list... how did I forget Eastern Market? Bars, restaurants, fresh produce, and downtown and midtown a stone's throw away.

    A lot of good places actually...and as a young person, I never considered living anywhere in the metro region but Detroit.

  14. #39

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    I imagine myself living in Detroit when I have kids. So I've always catered my ideas about living in the city towards the family life. Bagley has always interested me as my neighborhood because it seems middle class and unpretentious. And I love the plethora of brick homes. Another area I love is Aviaton Sub, which is closer to downtown than Bagley.

  15. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwilbert View Post
    In my opinion, a person who is not married (or at least in a long-term relationship) and without kids should think twice before buying a house. Mobility is one of the great assets such a person has, and buying a house definitely devalues that asset.

    I understand that sentiment but to me it seems the opposite.

    Many of detroits problems such as crime and schools are a bigger factor for families than for say a single guy just starting out. I just got done renting a series of apartments and moved every year. I'm excited about the chance to have a place of my own. Plus which makes you feel more trapped, paying 20-25k in cash for a house or being 100k underwater on your house in the suburbs that you can't sell either. Don't get me wrong I'm a little nervous of being stuck but I don't see myself relocating anytime soon or ever. I'm also only considering neighborhoods that seem to have a bright future, i certainly wouldn't buy anywhere just because its cheap.


    It'll be years before i even start thinking of starting a family so now seems a logical time to take a few risks. Hopefully by the time i get to that point the school situation improves or there will at least be plenty of alternatives (for instance in EEV and the far east side you see lots of yard signs for the st Clare school in GPP). I'd hate to pay lots in tuition but hey at least theres no mortgage payment.

    One last point the expression "its easier to ask forgiveness than permission" comes to mind when starting a relationship. If you already live in the city and can show that your neighborhood is solid you have a better chance of selling the city to a significant other as opposed to just picking up and moving from the burbs.

    just my 2 cents

  16. #41

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    Wife and I moved back 2 years ago we will both be 31 by tomorrow. No kids yet but planning on some in the next year or two. Currently living Downtown but will be looking for a house in Midtown, Woodbridge, Corktown, or the Villages before having kids. We currently don't plan on moving out of the city when they reach school age. I absolutly love living Downtown, it's awesome to look out the window and see the city all around you at night.

  17. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by buzzman0077 View Post
    Wife and I moved back 2 years ago we will both be 31 by tomorrow. No kids yet but planning on some in the next year or two. Currently living Downtown but will be looking for a house in Midtown, Woodbridge, Corktown, or the Villages before having kids. We currently don't plan on moving out of the city when they reach school age. I absolutly love living Downtown, it's awesome to look out the window and see the city all around you at night.

    If you are interested in living in the Villages (Indian Village, Berry Subdivision, West & East Village) check out this website:

    http://thevillagesofdetroit.com/the-villages/

  18. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neilr View Post
    The Mies van der Rohe townhouses in Lafayette Park probably would not do for a ±23 year old who's still in school or just beginning their career. They are coops and, among other drawbacks (for that demographic), all require a substantial downpayment.
    This little beauty is up for sale,
    http://www.oconnordetroit.com/proper...401_joli/1.htm

  19. #44

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    My husband and I are 31 and 33, respectively, and have lived within the City limits for 7 years now. For the past 1.5 years we have been living in Woodbridge. I know that some other posters have written about the crime, but it does seem to have been better even just in the time that we have been here. We had several friends who were victimized in the year or so before we moved, and I was nervous about coming here for that reason. I haven't known anyone personally, either friend or acquaintance, who has been a victim of a crime in the year and a half that we have been here. So, while it's not perfect, I don't think it's as bad as it was.

    Also, we have a 2 year old daughter, and another on the way in June, and we have no intention of moving when they are in school. She is currently enrolled in a fantastic daycare , and will go to a private school when the time comes (probably either Waldorf or Friends). I love having a young child in the City, and the opportunities and challenges that it provides us as parents are exactly why we decided to have a family here instead of running off to Grosse Pointe.

    To answer your original question: Woodbridge, because of its easy access to EVERYTHING; ditto that for Midtown; Eastern Market, because it's got a lot of it's own stuff going on, and you could easily sustain yourself there with everything except maybe nightlife; and, downtown, because of the restaurants and shops (I would even extend this to include the near-riverfront locales).

  20. #45

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    I know its just a handful of people on a message board but I'm happy to hear about current and future parents who are raising kids in the city. This says lots about your dedication and hope for this town. Most will jet off to the burbs, and i respect that decision but its possible to lead a decent life in this town. Families add a lot more stability than just a bunch of hipsters (no offense to hipsters, the more the merrier!)
    I grew up downriver where there was NO diversity. Sure, the schools were decent but it was a real culture shock when I got to college.

    I get really pissed off when people equate raising kids in detroit to child abuse (the kind of shit you'll see on the freep forums) Of course the schools are struggling but I'm hopeful that the quality will improve over time. Anyway kudos to all the parents... things will look a lot better in a generation here if this trend grows!

    I may still look into Woodbridge If i don't buy a house right away (unfortunately buying a house there is wayyy over my budget) I get the vibe that it might be one of the coolest few blocks in this entire state. I do have to ask you WB residents though if the parking is as bad as it looks? I suck at parallel parking so that could be aggrevating.

  21. #46
    DetroitDad Guest

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    Downtown is the best for transit options. Midtown and Downtown also hold a large amount of jobs and schooling options. It depends on where you are going to school/work.

    I liked Downtown's Grand Circus Park neighborhood, as it had apartments of all income levels actually overlooking the park. Nothing will beat the excitement off living on Grand Circus Park, in Michigan. Although, the Millender Center is nice on convenience, but you pay for it.

    The smartest place in the city for a young person to live ($$$), would probably be New Center, the Cass Park area, or South Corktown (gritty industrial lofts, not luxury conversions).

  22. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwilbert View Post
    If they wanted to own, there are some units in 1300 Lafayette where the equity is very low and I would expect a young couple could likely swing it. The maintenance tends to be higher than in the townhouses though.
    I've checked out 1300 and the association fee was a dealbreaker for me, though I could have put together the down payment for a no-frills one bedroom.

  23. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by rencense View Post
    Southwest/Hubbard: I'd be curious to see if this is starting to become a popular area for the younger/new to Detroit crowd. SW offers, as mentioned, pretty good retail etc. Hubbard farms reminds me a bit of woodbridge and appears to be doing quite well.
    I never really took the time to look at Hubbard Farms, but it is a really neat neighborhood. Lots of row houses, flats and duplexes, and also just some really nice older homes. I was sad to see that the set of red row houses on Vinewood between Vernor and Bagley were burned out. The neighborhood is like 95% intact and looks well-maintained. It is also anchored by Clark Park, which is pretty decent. You are also really close to downtown.

    Quote Originally Posted by English
    I've checked out 1300 and the association fee was a dealbreaker for me, though I could have put together the down payment for a no-frills one bedroom.
    This is a really nice building. I looked into buying into the coop at 1300 about 2 years ago, and yes, it was a very small amount for a 1-bedroom. I think it was like $3k or something. Association fee was high, but the building was secure, had underground parking, and great views of the city skyline. At that point, I didn't want to be tied down to a place, but I would very much be interested to know what the coops are going for now.

  24. #49

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    I've checked out 1300 and the association fee was a dealbreaker for me, though I could have put together the down payment for a no-frills one bedroom.
    I completely sympathize--in the current low interest rate environment you are very likely better off financially buying something that costs more and has lower carrying costs. I'd guess that is why the equity is so low on some of the units. On the other hand, the amenities are good and the association fee is pretty inclusive, covering both taxes and heat, although I'm sure you knew that.

    At that point, I didn't want to be tied down to a place, but I would very much be interested to know what the coops are going for now.
    This is the best place I know for that information:

    http://www.vasileffrealtydetroit.com...OOPERATIVE.htm

  25. #50

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    Hamtramck!

    Or around WSU somewhere.

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