Chroma in Milwaukee Junction
MILWAUKEE JUNCTION RISING  »

FUN THINGS TO DO IN DETROIT »



Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 55
  1. #1

    Default What are the best neighborhoods for young people moving to Detroit?

    I started a thread similar to this before, but it didn't really take off the way I wanted it to. So, I decided to map out what neighborhoods each of my 15 friends live in: http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en...4e9c35691ddd57

    Of my 15 friends who live in the city, everyone in the group is between the ages of 22-30. The group includes a mix of races, but is predominately white. Most live in lofts or apartments and are renters. Only 1 person owns a condo. 14/15 either went to school in Detroit, work in Detroit, or both. 10/14 were born and raised in Metro Detroit. 2 are from another country, 1 is a transplant from the East Coast, and 1 is a transplant from the South West. Only 5 are females (however, I don't have many female friends since I'm in a relationship ). 14/15 have a bachelor's degree or higher. Less than half have roommates or live with a significant other. None are currently married. Only one has kids (that I know of!).

    I did not include acquaintances, which would bring the total up to around 25-30 city dwellers. I also didn't include friends who did live in Detroit, but have since moved out-of-state, which would add 3 more to downtown and 1 more to Lafayette Park. I also didn't include friends in inner-ring suburbs, but there are at least 8 who live in East Dearborn, Ferndale, Royal Oak, or the Grosse Pointes. Surprisingly, I do not have any friends in Corktown or Woodbridge, so those areas are unrepresented on my map, in addition to many other solid neighborhoods.

    The whole point of this is to see where young people are living in the city, and consequently, to determine the best neighborhoods for young people looking to move to Detroit. In answering this question, consider these factors that would make a neighborhood desireable:

    • Safest
    • Nicest housing options
    • Most walkable
    • Best bars and restuarants
    • Proximity to entertainment and nightlife
    • Proximity to cultural and educational institutions
    • Proximity to planned or existing mass transit
    • Proximity to groceries
    • Trendiest areas
    • Most interesting

    I think these are among the factors that most young people consider when looking for a place in the city. Personally, I like downtown, but could see myself in many other neighborhoods.

    So, if you were a young person moving to Detroit, where would you live and why?

  2. #2

    Default

    I am 24 and I live downtown. It is pretty safe and to be honest I like it because I am close to where I go to school and I like being able to walk to the bars around Greektown or walk to the stadiums.

    Haha that is about it.

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm sorry, I can't resist: "What is the best city for a young person moving out of Detroit?"

    Now, to answer your question seriously. In order best to worst: Woodbridge, Southwest, Downtown.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by socks_mahoney View Post
    Now, to answer your question seriously. In order best to worst: Woodbridge, Southwest, Downtown.
    Yeah, but why? What is it about Woodbridge? The Pub? The houses? The proximity to WSU? What is it about SW? The grocers and Mexican food? I think downtown is pretty self-explanatory.

  5. #5

    Default

    Woodbridge-Lots of other young people, its quieter than most of the city. Close to Midtown, century old trees lining the streets. Lots of energy and visioning going on there. Folks really take ownership of their space: Community gardens, a refreshed The Hole Park. folks really just go for walks. Commonwealth Street may be the most pleasant place to be outside of Belle Isle on a summer day.I think the pub may be overrated, but that just means one of these new people has to open something else, hopefully a bit more low key.

    SW-Good walkable access to retail, esp along W vernor. close to the river. Strong community.

    Downtown-I dont know if thats the MOST self explanatory. I always thought that my friends who lived downtown existed in this little island where everything you needed was far away. especially late at night. alas, this can be said about a lot of detroit.

    cool

  6. #6

    Default

    Downtown or Midtown

  7. #7

    Default

    Answer: where ever you want to live. You are young, make that community your own. Get involved.

  8. #8

    Default

    My wife and I moved downtown to be near everything. Rarely do I use my car on the weekend. We either walk everywhere or People Mover it (when it makes sense). The particular building I live in has great amenities which make it even better.

    Unfortunately the best local grocer for us is Honeybee. But we don't mind heading over there.

    However, we are considering purchasing in the next couple years and probably would look to somewhere like Corktown, Woodbridge, or Midtown.

    Unless of course I win the lotto and can purchase the Penthouse on top of the Broderick

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sumas View Post
    Answer: where ever you want to live. You are young, make that community your own. Get involved.
    The Fourth Street neighborhood, at the northeast corner of Lodge Freeway/Ford Freeway.
    EVERYTHING is walking distance, including Wayne State University, College For Creative Studies
    (both campuses), groceries, coffee shops, florists, bakeries, and yes, pubs.
    The entire campus area, is alive and vibrant and young and old and mixed race and getting
    greener by the minute. Henry Ford Hospital is beginning a new, modern era.
    The DMC is beginning a new, modern, new owner era. Wayne State is constantly burgeoning,
    and there's new construction going on as we speak.
    The whole UpTown/MidTown/Wayne State/Cultural Area, is breaking out, and up!!!!
    I personally live in Woodbridge, where we have the best of both worlds.
    We are within walking/biking distance of ALL the areas listed above, and,
    as mentioned previously, we are a quiet (mostly) neighborhood. There's a strong sense of
    community here, and nearly everyone is involved in some aspect of gardening, recycling,
    greening, activism, entertainment, etc. Many teachers/professors live here, and definitely
    more than one musician takes up residence within our small community.
    The area around the site of the 'Dally In The Ally', is also a pretty happening area, and
    directly in the middle of everything WSU.
    Take your pick. Detroit, in Midtown anyway, is chock full of good, decent, relatively safe,
    places to live, and thrive, as a young person in today's world.
    Good luck and cheers.

  10. #10

    Default

    Brightmoor

  11. #11

    Default

    I think Brush Park would be pretty attractive. You can get to everything in Downtown and Midtown really easily and you are close to Eastern Market for shopping.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sumas View Post
    Answer: where ever you want to live. You are young, make that community your own. Get involved.
    Thumbs up.

    From an "outsiders view" Midtown seems to have allot going for it, from the not being there reading the press research point of view.

    But I am considered old so I have to find somewhere else : )

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by socks_mahoney View Post
    Woodbridge-Lots of other young people, its quieter than most of the city. Close to Midtown, century old trees lining the streets. Lots of energy and visioning going on there. Folks really take ownership of their space: Community gardens, a refreshed The Hole Park. folks really just go for walks. Commonwealth Street may be the most pleasant place to be outside of Belle Isle on a summer day.
    This makes me really want to move to Woodbridge. It's a calm contrast to the loud, hectic, chaos of downtown, but still connected.

    Quote Originally Posted by mwilbert
    I think Brush Park would be pretty attractive. You can get to everything in Downtown and Midtown really easily and you are close to Eastern Market for shopping.
    I also like Brush Park because it sort of straddles downtown and Midtown. Once the rail line is put in, you really have good mobility. You'd also have the new stadium to look forward to.

  14. #14

    Default

    BrushStart
    I have to assume that this venture or adventure does not involve sending the kids of this young couple into the Detroit public school system? Or is this just a young couple (late 20-early 30's) looking to make a difference in the urban environment of Detroit for a few years prior to starting to raise a family at which point they would be moving back to the burbs?

    Let the arrows fly at will.....

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EASTSIDE CAT 67-83 View Post
    BrushStart
    I have to assume that this venture or adventure does not involve sending the kids of this young couple into the Detroit public school system? Or is this just a young couple (late 20-early 30's) looking to make a difference in the urban environment of Detroit for a few years prior to starting to raise a family at which point they would be moving back to the burbs?

    Let the arrows fly at will.....
    My wife and I are in our mid to late 20's...almost 30 for me. YIKES!
    But really, we anticipate never leaving the city. Private schools are an option for us, albeit expensive. But maybe by the time we decide to have children and they are old enough the school system will be heading in a better direction (Wishful thinking).

    It's great that we have young people moving into Detroit, but I think we need more people who are willing to settle here; have some roots, etc.

    I love this town and that's what I plan on doing.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EASTSIDE CAT 67-83 View Post
    BrushStart
    I have to assume that this venture or adventure does not involve sending the kids of this young couple into the Detroit public school system? Or is this just a young couple (late 20-early 30's) looking to make a difference in the urban environment of Detroit for a few years prior to starting to raise a family at which point they would be moving back to the burbs?

    Let the arrows fly at will.....
    Well, to be honest, I hadn't really thought about it. I have friends who went to DPS and turned out fine, though they went to the better high schools, Renaissance and Cass Tech. At this point, if I had kids, I probably wouldn't be willing to send them to DPS. I might try for the charter schools or pay for private. Kids are probably 5-7 years out for me, so DPS may be a totally different story by then.

    Overall, I guess I am talking about people like me (basically, yuppies) between 20-35 looking for the best urban lifestyle in Detroit. Come to think about it though, the question can transcend age because a lot of empty-nesters and people at the peak of their careers are also looking for similar things in terms of urban environments. I always just tend to think of it in terms of people in my own demographic because that's my point-of-view.

    So, feel free to discuss this in terms of all demographics, not necessarily just young people.

  17. #17

    Default

    That's kinda why I asked the question. I come from a 4th generation Detroit family, when I was a young kid going to Guyton elementary on the lower eastside, our neighborhood was loaded with my classmates whose family had "roots" in Detroit, maybe not so much anymore but I think to achieve the "best neighborhoods" living experience you are speaking of....kids are a critical element of that vision if you are looking to sustain development and growth anywhere on the planet.
    Last edited by EASTSIDE CAT 67-83; February-10-11 at 10:28 AM.

  18. #18
    DetroitPole Guest

    Default

    Midtown, downtown, followed by Southwest.

    Why? They're all walkable urban areas and relatively safe, especially downtown and midtown. Midtown has WSU and the museums and galleries. As much press as this receives, you'd think its rocket science or something.

    Sorry, Woodbridge no longer makes my list. While it is cute as hell and close to everything cool, I know too many people who have been the victims of serious violent crime there. I think there is a lot of crime of opportunity because the bad guys know there are students, teachers, and profs living there with at least something to steal.

    You could include Corktown to the list. Close to downtown, bars, 5 minutes from anywhere you want to be. Not as many rentals as Midtown, downtown, or the geographic area of SW, though.

    In my experience, midtown and downtown are very safe - especially Midtown with WSU cops on the prowl and only a phone call away.

    What interests me most is that these are TINY areas compared to the rest of the city, and while they're hailed as Detroit's resurgence, or whatever the hell is supposed to be happening, I don't see hip young people ever reaching a critical mass and spreading out to 7 mile and Van Dyke for any particular reason or about 100 other square miles of the city.

    Eastside, since you invited the arrows...this may not be your intent, but I do find the attitude of "some kids move into the city and then move out when they've grown up" pretty condescending. There is an implication there that these are wide-eyed kids just looking for the thrill of living in the city for a few years and then suddenly one day grab a pair of dockers, a riding lawnmower, a border collie and move to Shelby Township. It really remains to be seen what they will do. As one poster attested, he is young and intends to stay. I moved here when I was younger and bought a house here. Frankly, if these kids grow up and move, it will probably be to another urban area in another state, looking for a better urban experience. They've also played a part of an actual demographic shift against white flight in the city for the first time in 50 years, so this isn't just a dozen hippies with a garden either.

    While many people attest that they lived in cities as a young person for the bars and galleries and later grew to value those less and moved, for millions of people they never lose an affinity for urban living, even if they don't hit the bar every night. Look at the demographics of every major city - they are composed of mostly adults, after all. There are no other very large cities in Michigan, so it will likely be our loss if they do leave.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitPole View Post
    Midtown, downtown, followed by Southwest.

    Why? They're all walkable urban areas and relatively safe, especially downtown and midtown. Midtown has WSU and the museums and galleries. As much press as this receives, you'd think its rocket science or something.

    Sorry, Woodbridge no longer makes my list. While it is cute as hell and close to everything cool, I know too many people who have been the victims of serious violent crime there. I think there is a lot of crime of opportunity because the bad guys know there are students, teachers, and profs living there with at least something to steal.

    You could include Corktown to the list. Close to downtown, bars, 5 minutes from anywhere you want to be. Not as many rentals as Midtown, downtown, or the geographic area of SW, though.

    In my experience, midtown and downtown are very safe - especially Midtown with WSU cops on the prowl and only a phone call away.

    What interests me most is that these are TINY areas compared to the rest of the city, and while they're hailed as Detroit's resurgence, or whatever the hell is supposed to be happening, I don't see hip young people ever reaching a critical mass and spreading out to 7 mile and Van Dyke for any particular reason or about 100 other square miles of the city.

    Eastside, since you invited the arrows...this may not be your intent, but I do find the attitude of "some kids move into the city and then move out when they've grown up" pretty condescending. There is an implication there that these are wide-eyed kids just looking for the thrill of living in the city for a few years and then suddenly one day grab a pair of dockers, a riding lawnmower, a border collie and move to Shelby Township. It really remains to be seen what they will do. As one poster attested, he is young and intends to stay. I moved here when I was younger and bought a house here. Frankly, if these kids grow up and move, it will probably be to another urban area in another state, looking for a better urban experience. They've also played a part of an actual demographic shift against white flight in the city for the first time in 50 years, so this isn't just a dozen hippies with a garden either.

    While many people attest that they lived in cities as a young person for the bars and galleries and later grew to value those less and moved, for millions of people they never lose an affinity for urban living, even if they don't hit the bar every night. Look at the demographics of every major city - they are composed of mostly adults, after all. There are no other very large cities in Michigan, so it will likely be our loss if they do leave.
    Is there an actual demographic shift against the white flight in the city? I am not trying to argue with you because I suppose I fit that mold but did someone actually measure it?

  20. #20

    Default

    When I moved back to Detroit in 1998 I moved to the Berry Subdivision which I love. However, I am no where near 20, 30, or even 40 but if I was I would either live in Midtown, New Center, or Corktown. Why because I feel they are all great neighborhoods that have exhibited their appreciation for the architecture by preserving rather that tearing down. Plus they are are Hip and Happening...PS...my grandson just told me that 60 was the new 40 so maybe I should move....

  21. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitPole View Post
    What interests me most is that these are TINY areas compared to the rest of the city, and while they're hailed as Detroit's resurgence, or whatever the hell is supposed to be happening, I don't see hip young people ever reaching a critical mass and spreading out to 7 mile and Van Dyke for any particular reason or about 100 other square miles of the city.
    Ever hear of the 100th monkey? It's a debunked myth, but I think it has some applications in the way people behave.

    Anyway, remember, there was a time when people wouldn't move to SoHo, let alone the Bowery (now renamed NoLiTa) or the Lower East Side. If you had asked people in 1978 if downtown Manhattan would ever come back, they'd have laughed in your face. Heck, if you had asked Detroiters in 1915 if the development would stretch all the way to Rochester, they may have laughed at you ("What, out in all those beet fields? In the middle of nowhere?)

  22. #22

    Default

    What interests me most is that these are TINY areas compared to the rest of the city, and while they're hailed as Detroit's resurgence, or whatever the hell is supposed to be happening, I don't see hip young people ever reaching a critical mass and spreading out to 7 mile and Van Dyke for any particular reason or about 100 other square miles of the city.
    I'm pretty sure there aren't any large cities where "hip young people" fill anything close to a majority of the housing units, so the fact that they won't reach 7 Mile and Van Dyke doesn't trouble me. I do expect to see those people extending up and down Woodward further than they do now. I could envision the neighborhood boundaries expanding to the point where there was pretty continuous urbanity stretching from Virginia Park down to downtown, west to Mexicantown, and north to Woodbridge. That would be a pretty attractive place to live, if still only maybe 5% of the city's area.

  23. #23

    Default

    Anyway, remember, there was a time when people wouldn't move to SoHo, let alone the Bowery (now renamed NoLiTa) or the Lower East Side
    I remember when the Bowery was really not anyplace you wanted to be. Now there's a Whole Foods. Last time I was in New York I actually stayed at a hotel EAST of the Bowery. That would have been inadvisable in the late 70's.

  24. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Detroitnerd View Post
    Ever hear of the 100th monkey? It's a debunked myth, but I think it has some applications in the way people behave.

    Anyway, remember, there was a time when people wouldn't move to SoHo, let alone the Bowery (now renamed NoLiTa) or the Lower East Side. If you had asked people in 1978 if downtown Manhattan would ever come back, they'd have laughed in your face.
    That's true. I have a few friends who are native NYers and under the age of 30, and they can't believe the prices that people are paying to live in areas like the E. Village and Lower East Side.

  25. #25

    Default

    The Mies van der Rohe townhouses in Lafayette Park probably would not do for a ±23 year old who's still in school or just beginning their career. They are coops and, among other drawbacks (for that demographic), all require a substantial downpayment. However, the 3 glass highrises, also designed by Mies, are rental with yearly leases so they are much more accessible for a young person who wants to live in a safe walkable downtown neighborhood. The CBD, Eastern Market, Greektown, the Dequindre Cut and the Riverwalk are no more than a 12 minute walk away.

    In the last several years there has been a definite uptick in young couples who are a bit older, more settled, and with children moving into the coops. Chrysler Elementary School is considered to be one of the best in Detroit. It is accessible to the entire Mies van der Rohe part of the neighborhood (and several other coops) by sidewalk. There is no need to cross a street to get there.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Instagram
BEST ONLINE FORUM FOR
DETROIT-BASED DISCUSSION
DetroitYES Awarded BEST OF DETROIT 2015 - Detroit MetroTimes - Best Online Forum for Detroit-based Discussion 2015

ENJOY DETROITYES?


AND HAVE ADS REMOVED DETAILS »





Welcome to DetroitYES! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
DetroitYES! is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to DetroitYES! [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.