Chroma in Milwaukee Junction
MILWAUKEE JUNCTION RISING  »

FUN THINGS TO DO IN DETROIT »



Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1

    Default Dutch garden designer eyes Belle Isle

    Exciting news

    DNR to host open houses Nov. 14 and 28 on proposed Belle Isle garden by renowned Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf
    Contact: Amanda Hertl, 313-396-6872
    Agency: Natural Resources


    http://www.michigan.gov/som/0,4669,7...1288--,00.html
    Nov. 1, 2017

    The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Garden Club of Michigan will host two public meetings Nov. 14 and Nov. 28 to gather public input on a proposed garden in Detroit's Belle Isle Park. The garden will be designed by internationally renowned garden designer Piet Oudolf.

    Oudolf’s acclaimed gardens include the Lurie Garden in Chicago and the Highline in New York City, among scores of gardens around the world. He is one today's premier garden designers for public landscapes and is a leading figure of the "New Perennial" movement that is characterized by utilizing herbaceous perennials and grasses. His garden designs are artistic, ecologically inspired, accessible, welcoming and enjoyed year-round.
    After touring Detroit with the Garden Club of Michigan this past spring, Oudolf selected Belle Isle Park as the proposed site for one of his acclaimed garden designs. The site, located near the Nancy Brown Carillon Peace tower between the Remick Band Shell and the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, will be a connector in the cultural heart of the park. It also will help revitalize the island and attract garden lovers from near and far. The proposed garden will be paid for through donations and fundraising that will cover all the design, installation and maintenance costs.


    Oudolf described the proposed Belle Isle site as a connector for people and activities on the island and "an opportunity to reinvigorate the adjacent structures and facilities."

    Since its founding in 1911, the Garden Club of Michigan has been undertaking projects to improve Detroit landscapes. While bringing Oudolf to Detroit is its latest endeavor, the club recently paid for and completed the installation of a new irrigation system and beautifully designed planters on Belle Isle’s Sunset Point. As part of the project, the garden club has compiled a budget, including maintenance funds, created a fundraising goal and program, and is working closely with the DNR to follow the review process for new proposals as outlined in the Belle Isle Park draft strategic management plan. The proposed garden has been presented to the city of Detroit Planning and Development Department and the Garden Club of Michigan has secured the department's support. Such support from the city and community is important for the approval of new infrastructure on Belle Isle.

    "It is vital that the community has an opportunity to weigh in on the proposal," said Scott Pratt, chief of Southern Field Operations for the DNR. "It is equally important that the DNR and the garden club ensure that the garden will be financially sustainable and has the support of state and city agencies.”

    OPEN HOUSE DATES, DETAILS

    At the Nov. 14 and Nov. 28 open houses, participants will be able to view a short video of Oudolf discussing his vision for the garden and provides insight into the preferred site location. He also will respond to a few questions submitted by the public ahead of time. Both open houses will take place at the Flynn Pavilion, 4435 Muse Road, in Belle Isle Park in Detroit.

    The first open house will take place Tuesday, Nov. 14, 6 to 8 p.m.

    The second open house (Tuesday, Nov. 28, 3 to 5 p.m.) will address questions that arise from the first open house.

    Questions for Oudolf can be submitted through Monday, Nov. 6, to Amanda Hertl, DNR urban area field planner, at [email protected] or 313-396-6872.

    Belle Isle Park, a 982-acre island park located in the Detroit River near downtown Detroit, is rich with natural beauty and historical and cultural resources. The park – managed as Michigan’s 102nd state park – is home to the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, the Belle Isle Aquarium, a golf course, the James Scott Memorial Fountain and many more attractions popular with all ages and interests. The park offers a variety of outdoor activities, including hiking, bicycling, kayaking and picnicking, as well as community events including the Detroit Ford Fireworks, Senior Power Days, an annual spring cleanup, the Detroit YMCA’s Detroit Swims program and fitness walks and other programs.

    For more information, contact Amanda Hertl at 313-396-6872 or [email protected].

    An accompanying photo of Piet Oudolf (courtesy of Piet Oudolf) is available below for download. Additional photos are available at http://duncanmcampbell.com/PietOudolf./

  2. #2

    Default

    So this clown wants to tear out more natural habitat and put in phony landscaping, a tribute to his greatness. Why doesn't the Department of National Racing just build a mall with a parking lot and call it a day.

  3. #3

    Default

    Fixed the link. Click below for photos of his work:

    http://duncanmcampbell.com/PietOudolf/

    Beautiful work. I support this for the island.


    Quote Originally Posted by Crystal View Post
    Exciting news

    DNR to host open houses Nov. 14 and 28 on proposed Belle Isle garden by renowned Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf
    Contact: Amanda Hertl, 313-396-6872
    Agency: Natural Resources


    http://www.michigan.gov/som/0,4669,7...1288--,00.html
    Nov. 1, 2017

    The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Garden Club of Michigan will host two public meetings Nov. 14 and Nov. 28 to gather public input on a proposed garden in Detroit's Belle Isle Park. The garden will be designed by internationally renowned garden designer Piet Oudolf.

    Oudolf’s acclaimed gardens include the Lurie Garden in Chicago and the Highline in New York City, among scores of gardens around the world. He is one today's premier garden designers for public landscapes and is a leading figure of the "New Perennial" movement that is characterized by utilizing herbaceous perennials and grasses. His garden designs are artistic, ecologically inspired, accessible, welcoming and enjoyed year-round.
    After touring Detroit with the Garden Club of Michigan this past spring, Oudolf selected Belle Isle Park as the proposed site for one of his acclaimed garden designs. The site, located near the Nancy Brown Carillon Peace tower between the Remick Band Shell and the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, will be a connector in the cultural heart of the park. It also will help revitalize the island and attract garden lovers from near and far. The proposed garden will be paid for through donations and fundraising that will cover all the design, installation and maintenance costs.


    Oudolf described the proposed Belle Isle site as a connector for people and activities on the island and "an opportunity to reinvigorate the adjacent structures and facilities."

    Since its founding in 1911, the Garden Club of Michigan has been undertaking projects to improve Detroit landscapes. While bringing Oudolf to Detroit is its latest endeavor, the club recently paid for and completed the installation of a new irrigation system and beautifully designed planters on Belle Isle’s Sunset Point. As part of the project, the garden club has compiled a budget, including maintenance funds, created a fundraising goal and program, and is working closely with the DNR to follow the review process for new proposals as outlined in the Belle Isle Park draft strategic management plan. The proposed garden has been presented to the city of Detroit Planning and Development Department and the Garden Club of Michigan has secured the department's support. Such support from the city and community is important for the approval of new infrastructure on Belle Isle.

    "It is vital that the community has an opportunity to weigh in on the proposal," said Scott Pratt, chief of Southern Field Operations for the DNR. "It is equally important that the DNR and the garden club ensure that the garden will be financially sustainable and has the support of state and city agencies.”

    OPEN HOUSE DATES, DETAILS

    At the Nov. 14 and Nov. 28 open houses, participants will be able to view a short video of Oudolf discussing his vision for the garden and provides insight into the preferred site location. He also will respond to a few questions submitted by the public ahead of time. Both open houses will take place at the Flynn Pavilion, 4435 Muse Road, in Belle Isle Park in Detroit.

    The first open house will take place Tuesday, Nov. 14, 6 to 8 p.m.

    The second open house (Tuesday, Nov. 28, 3 to 5 p.m.) will address questions that arise from the first open house.

    Questions for Oudolf can be submitted through Monday, Nov. 6, to Amanda Hertl, DNR urban area field planner, at [email protected] or 313-396-6872.

    Belle Isle Park, a 982-acre island park located in the Detroit River near downtown Detroit, is rich with natural beauty and historical and cultural resources. The park – managed as Michigan’s 102nd state park – is home to the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, the Belle Isle Aquarium, a golf course, the James Scott Memorial Fountain and many more attractions popular with all ages and interests. The park offers a variety of outdoor activities, including hiking, bicycling, kayaking and picnicking, as well as community events including the Detroit Ford Fireworks, Senior Power Days, an annual spring cleanup, the Detroit YMCA’s Detroit Swims program and fitness walks and other programs.

    For more information, contact Amanda Hertl at 313-396-6872 or [email protected].

    An accompanying photo of Piet Oudolf (courtesy of Piet Oudolf) is available below for download. Additional photos are available at http://duncanmcampbell.com/PietOudolf./

  4. #4

    Default

    Nice work. A low-slung, prarie style garden would look nice in the big field leading up to the lighthouse. Maybe some raised earthworks with benches on top to look at the water. NYC did something like that on Governor's island recently and it's fantastic.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Honky Tonk View Post
    So this clown wants to tear out more natural habitat and put in phony landscaping, a tribute to his greatness. Why doesn't the Department of National Racing just build a mall with a parking lot and call it a day.
    Other than the forest section, all of Belle Isle has been intensely modified from its natural state. The site described is currently grass. Whatever he does will likely be equally artificial as mowed grass and a man made lake, but at least there will be plants there.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason View Post
    Other than the forest section, all of Belle Isle has been intensely modified from its natural state. The site described is currently grass. Whatever he does will likely be equally artificial as mowed grass and a man made lake, but at least there will be plants there.
    I have a hard time equating an internationally renowned garden with "racing" or a "new mall" on Belle Isle. But while we're opposing man-made structures I really wish we could just get rid of the stupid fountain, the baseball fields, the pompous conservatory, and the artificial aquarium.

  7. #7

    Default

    OK Honky Tonk... what are you getting at?

    Would you rather the Frederick Law Olmstead designed middle 550 acres of the park look like the natural habitat that the city left it in after a half century of neglect... or bring it back to its' look of over 100 years ago?
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    OK Honky Tonk... what are you getting at?

    Would you rather the Frederick Law Olmstead designed middle 550 acres of the park look like the natural habitat that the city left it in after a half century of neglect... or bring it back to its' look of over 100 years ago?

    The last photo is hilarious, Gistok. If you think the contrived landscape, photo-shopped image looks good, then you probably have a black velvet of Martin Luther King, Bobby Kennedy, and Elvis on your living room wall. It needs some work, granted, but I find the first photo way more appealing. The Island is a natural wildlife habitat, and a major bird migratory stop. I don't want it to end up looking like Mackinac Island, complete with gift shop.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by corktownyuppie View Post
    I have a hard time equating an internationally renowned garden with "racing" or a "new mall" on Belle Isle. But while we're opposing man-made structures I really wish we could just get rid of the stupid fountain, the baseball fields, the pompous conservatory, and the artificial aquarium.
    Were you drinking Krap beer when you posted this? I'm seldom prevented from using the Island because of a ball game, or going deaf from the noise the fish and fountain make. It would be great if they poured a concrete road around the "internationally renowned" garden so, people could just drive their SUV to look @ it, no need to get out. Don't forget the selfie stick.

  10. #10

    Default

    Gee Honky Tonk, you jealous they didn't ask you to redesign the island?

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dtowncitylover View Post
    Gee Honky Tonk, you jealous they didn't ask you to redesign the island?
    WOW, dtowncitylover, I didn't know you were a psychic! Guess what I'm thinking now....

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Honky Tonk View Post
    WOW, dtowncitylover, I didn't know you were a psychic! Guess what I'm thinking now....
    Awww bless your heart

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dtowncitylover View Post
    Awww bless your heart
    .........

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Honky Tonk View Post
    So this clown wants to tear out more natural habitat and put in phony landscaping, a tribute to his greatness. Why doesn't the Department of National Racing just build a mall with a parking lot and call it a day.
    One gets the feeling that the Friends of Belle Isle and Garden Club of Michigan aren't your cup of tea?

    Equating the gardeners with the Penske group et al... is kind of a weak analogy....

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    OK Honky Tonk... what are you getting at?

    Would you rather the Frederick Law Olmstead designed middle 550 acres of the park look like the natural habitat that the city left it in after a half century of neglect... or bring it back to its' look of over 100 years ago?

    giosk,
    Any idea what year those PC's are?
    I've a nice pic of an uncle by the channel in 1922 and the boats were more the size of gondolas.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wilderness View Post
    giosk,
    Any idea what year those PC's are?
    I've a nice pic of an uncle by the channel in 1922 and the boats were more the size of gondolas.
    The first of the two is for sale as 1908.

  17. #17

    Default

    Like I said on the other thread, Mackinaw Island South. No motor vehicles.

    Make it something to be a destination. Who knows, maybe even a hotel?

  18. #18

    Default

    This was an interesting summary of the history of Belle Isle. Based on Olmsted's description of what he first saw on the island, we may not want to go completely natural:

    Conditions could not be more favorable to the breeding and nursing of mosquitoes…the pools, in September, I found discolored, and covered by bubbles and a green scum; and there was putrescent organic matter on their borders. They are thus available to the propagation of typhoid, malarial, and other zymotic poisons; and it may be questioned whether the city is justified in allowing, not to say inviting, ignorant people and children to stray near them.

  19. #19

    Default

    This will be an excellent compliment to the nearby conservatory.

    Internationally renowned designer Piet Oudolf has agreed to design a garden for Belle Isle and is open to additional commissions in Detroit.
    The island garden will be planted on a 1.5-acre, grassy site near the Nancy Brown Peace Memorial Carillon and the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, a site chosen by Oudolf himself during a visit to Detroit earlier this year.

    The Dutch-born Oudolf is considered by many to be a modern-day Frederick Law Olmsted, the 19th-century designer credited with much of the original design for Belle Isle, as well as New York City's Central Park. He worked on design of the High Line park in New York City — which transformed an old elevated rail line into a public space — and the Lurie Garden in Chicago.
    http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...oudolf-is-a-go

  20. #20

    Default

    There will be a DFT documentary on Piet Oudolf "Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf" on Thursday January 4 at 7pm. Following the film will be a conversation with Oudolf & the filmmaker. (I am not clear if this will be prerecorded since Oudolf lives in Holland)
    His previous projects include: High Line in NYC, Lurie Garden in Millenium Park Chicago, No.5 Culture Chanel in Paris, and Serpentine Gallery in London, among others.
    Thank you to The Garden Club of Michigan for commissioning him for this space on Belle Isle!

  21. #21

  22. #22

    Default

    It is great to hear that work has begun on the wildflower garden designed by Piet Oudolf. This is an important development. There may be no landscape architect more creative than Oudolf at this genre of work.

  23. #23

    Default

    Nice.
    Hope all plants are native to the area.

  24. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobl View Post
    Nice.
    Hope all plants are native to the area.
    According to this article, that's how he has been designing lately:

    Oudolf's work can be found on New York City's Highline, in Chicago's Lurie Garden, and throughout the world. His latest gardens are primarily composed of native perennials and grasses, and are designed around plants' structures and seasonal changes as opposed to color or flowers.

    Here's a list of the plants you can sponsor, but it doesn't say if it's a complete list.

  25. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobl View Post
    Nice.
    Hope all plants are native to the area.
    Some are, some aren't.

    Non-natives include:
    Persicaria amplexicaulis - Native to China and the Himilayas
    Astilbe chinensis - China
    Geranium phaeum - Southern/Central Europe
    Achillea 'Moonshine' - hybrid w/Egyptian plant

    Natives Include:
    Liatris pycnostachya - Blazing Star
    Asclepias tuberosa - Butterflyweed
    Asclepias purpurascens - Milkweed
    Asclepias incarnata - Swamp Milkweed

    I haven't gone through the whole list, but at first blush.....

    maybe 1/3 pure native, with the rest a mix of cultivars and non-natives.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Instagram
BEST ONLINE FORUM FOR
DETROIT-BASED DISCUSSION
DetroitYES Awarded BEST OF DETROIT 2015 - Detroit MetroTimes - Best Online Forum for Detroit-based Discussion 2015

ENJOY DETROITYES?


AND HAVE ADS REMOVED DETAILS »





Welcome to DetroitYES! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
DetroitYES! is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to DetroitYES! [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.