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  1. #51

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    The new Karegnondi Water Authority plant is located near
    Columbiaville, Michigan in Lapeer County.

    Here is the 2016 Water Quality Report for Columbiaville:

    http://columbiaville.org/secure/uplo...de=transparent

    The reported fluoride in Columbiaville water, which was
    well water at the time, was over 1.0 ppm.

    Also check the level of chlorine in this report.

    It was 1.5 parts per million (ppm or milligrams per liter)
    and the low end value of the range was 0.88 ppm.
    Last edited by Dumpling; May-28-18 at 12:25 AM.

  2. #52

    Default

    I am now selecting a random NON - Michigan utility for comparison purposes...Seattle, Washington, for comparisons of fluoride statements
    of quantity of fluoride to be added and then the actual fluoride measured in their Water Quality Report.

    First, what Seattle says it will add is 0.7 ppm.

    http://www.seattle.gov/util/MyServic...ride/index.htm

    Then, checking a recent annual Water Quality Report, one finds
    that the fluoride for their two separate sources is listed as 0.7 ppm,

    http://www.seattle.gov/util/cs/group...t/1_063972.pdf

    and the fluoride range is 0.6 to 0.9 ppm.

    n their chlorine residual reads 0.98 ppm.
    Last edited by Dumpling; May-28-18 at 01:37 AM.

  3. #53

    Default

    Here is a 2016 Water Quality Report for Royal Oak Township.
    Look closely at the amount of fluoride reported to be present
    in the water for Royal Oak Township.

    https://www.oakgov.com/water/Documen...k_township.pdf

  4. #54

    Default

    Here is a 2016 Water Quality Report for Auburn Hills.
    Again, check the ppm of fluoride reported to be present.

    http://www.auburnhills.org/WATERQUALITYREPORT2016.pdf

  5. #55

    Default

    The City of Royal Oak has a 2017 Water Quality Report that
    breaks out lab results by water treatment plant:

    https://www.romi.gov/DocumentCenter/...ity-Report-PDF

  6. #56

    Default

    This one is from the City of Taylor (or its Golf Course! )

    http://www.lakesoftaylorgolf.com/Doc...er-Report-Info

    Fluoride - 0.54 ppm.

    Residual Chlorine - 0.67 ppm.
    Last edited by Dumpling; May-28-18 at 01:16 AM.

  7. #57

    Default

    One of the selling points for Karegnondi Water Authority water
    is that they have two separate supplies, treated water and
    raw water. The advantage for raw water is to industries so that
    they will not have to treat their water supply to remove the
    chemicals.

    http://www.gc4me.com/business/karegn...raw_water2.php

    Genesee County Drain Commissioner Jeff Wright: "This is about
    protecting and building our economy":

    https://www.detroitnews.com/story/ne...ant/107923086/

    It is possible that GLWA is catering more to the industrial
    customers, in competition with the Karegnondi Water Authority
    maybe even, than to public health in the matter of fluoride in
    the water.
    Last edited by Dumpling; May-28-18 at 01:06 AM.

  8. #58

    Default

    The City of Monroe, as deduced from its 2017 Water Quality Report,
    targets 0.7 ppm fluoride and 1.0 ppm chlorine residual.

    https://www.monroemi.gov/UserFiles/S...%202-21-18.pdf

  9. #59

    Default

    Again for the sake of comparison, this is the Water Quality Report
    for Windsor, Canada. There is little fluoride in their water because
    it is not added in. There is no mention of residual chlorine. They
    do use ozone to disinfect their water.

    https://www.townofwindsor.com/Docume...ty-report-2016

    There was an earlier thread in DetroitYes about the fluoride
    in the water in Windsor, Canada.

    https://www.detroityes.com/mb/showth...To-Their-Water

    Following up on that one:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windso...bers-1.4634555
    Last edited by Dumpling; May-28-18 at 01:34 AM.

  10. #60

    Default

    (This is DWSD not GLWA) The lead pipe replacements in
    Detroit as of right now are to be partial replacements rather
    than the preferable full replacements:

    http://michiganradio.org/post/risky-...-look-michigan

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    1,638

    Default

    I wonder if the Rain Gauge data collected by MacombCounty for the issue of stormwater in the INTERCEPTOR will become public info ?

    http://bit.ly/RainGaugesMacombCounty

    Nobody wants to pay for rain - but they pay -- ohhh do they pay !!!

    Some may remember this story in the newspapers
    http://www.candgnews.com/news/water-...r-shores-95082
    Last edited by O3H; May-28-18 at 08:33 PM.

  12. #62

    Default

    (Ahem, am still dilly dallying about calculating a working
    estimate of what a drainage charge for an inch of rainwater
    per square foot should be...but did not forget it entirely.)

    In today's NON Detroit news, but helpful for comparisons and contrasts
    with regional water matters including GLWA and the Flint water crisis,
    there is a well written if slightly sensationalized New York Times article about problems in recent years with the Newark water supply:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/24/n...gtype=Homepage

  13. #63

    Default

    The "lean" philosophy as in lean manufacturing has been implemented
    at GLWA as well as at other water and wastewater facilities.

    https://tataandhoward.com/2017/09/no...ter-utilities/

    There have been several articles recently such as this one today:

    https://www.fox2detroit.com/news/lea...ir-shore-homes

    While it is true that Lead and Copper Rule sampling methodologies
    have been revamped as per legal requirements it is also true that
    the addition of chemicals to water and wastewater has been modified - usually less of chemicals are being added - in keeping with lean philosophies.

    It is true that cost control is more of a focus for utilities as kind of
    a side effect from the extension of "lean" throughout much of the economy. Is adding the former, higher amount of chemicals more
    important, or is having a little savings better? The savings might
    go towards employee health care costs and higher wages.
    Last edited by Dumpling; November-04-19 at 06:53 PM.

  14. #64

    Default

    This is an update on the situation in metro Detroit for recent changes in
    sampling and reporting for Lead and Copper Rule water tests.
    There is quite a bit of info in this article but the info is in compact
    bits on interrelated topics.

    https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2019/11/17/stricter-rules-confirmation-lead-water-metro-detroit-communities/2450044001/
    Last edited by Dumpling; November-18-19 at 06:14 PM.

  15. #65

    Default

    The Action Level for lead in water has remained unchanged for years
    at 15 ppb, and though State of Michigan will change the Action Level
    to 12 ppb, it has not yet taken effect.

    There are now more samples being collected, they are being collected
    from known lead lines specifically, and some samples are being
    collected without a preflush. That is what has most notably changed
    at this time.

  16. #66

    Default

    To "snip" a statement from the Detroit News article - edited for
    emphasis:

    "[The State of Michigan]'s administrative rules were unsuccessfully
    legally challenged by Detroit, Livonia, Great Lakes Water Authority,
    and the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner, who argued
    the regulations impose unnecessary costs and will cause public money
    to replace private lead service lines."

    The motivation behind the lawsuit was costs. (The bolding is mine.)
    There has been, since before the standup of GLWA, a focus on
    the costs. To be fair, most of us are in a place where we have
    some concern about rising utility costs.

  17. #67

    Default

    This is pretty good news about City of Detroit water quality from
    a few days ago:

    https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/...-action-level/

    Also one quick check of the tap water within the last week
    at this location showed residual chlorine as 1.1 milligrams
    per liter which should knock out most of the bugs in the piping.

  18. #68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpling View Post
    To "snip" a statement from the Detroit News article - edited for
    emphasis:

    "[The State of Michigan]'s administrative rules were unsuccessfully
    legally challenged by Detroit, Livonia, Great Lakes Water Authority,
    and the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner, who argued
    the regulations impose unnecessary costs and will cause public money
    to replace private lead service lines."

    The motivation behind the lawsuit was costs. (The bolding is mine.)
    There has been, since before the standup of GLWA, a focus on
    the costs. To be fair, most of us are in a place where we have
    some concern about rising utility costs.
    I watched the Lincoln Park meeting on lead line replacement and the engineer stated that most of the water mains, due to age, would also need replacing. The estimate for just the lead line repair would be $3-5000.00 per household. 70 million if all mains and lead lines were replaced. And since this is a unfunded mandate a lot of cities will end up with sky high water bills (ours also have rubbish and recycling and other charges on them) and people unable to pay. He did also mention that the state is paying for Flint to replace the lead lines, but no more money is available for other cities.
    Last edited by lpg; November-26-19 at 09:17 AM. Reason: added info.

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