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  1. #1
    Willi Guest

    Default Great Lakes Water Authority [GLWA] next steps ?

    Thoughts on ""if"" this entity will actually do something or is it a ploy
    to appease the courts and the public. It's been really really quiet lately.
    Will business, universities and government transform the region for StormWater Management /

    Warren got hit hard and there is nothing in the media regarding plans for the spring melt





    Last edited by Willi; November-15-14 at 11:12 AM.

  2. #2
    Willi Guest

    Default

    Well, they had their first meeting and agreed to the State Appointed Rep from Snyder

    Do you feel properly represented when rate negotiations begin in 2015 ?

    Attachment 25235

  3. #3
    Willi Guest

    Default

    Maybe people in Metro Detroit need better situational awareness of their community

    Filmed in Detroit
    http://youtu.be/aQSHsuZrccM

    Last edited by Willi; December-27-14 at 12:35 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    So there was an incinerator fire at the wastewater treatment plant yesterday.
    It started on midnight shift. It apparently started at a conveyor belt at the
    fourth floor in Complex II incineration.
    On midnight shift usually there is a skeleton operations crew (how many crew
    members these days, I don't exactly know, but there has been a big push since
    EMA began managing the plant to reduce staff). On day shift there are contractors
    around as well as maintenance and other personnel so a fire would be more likely to
    be noticed when it was small. The conveyor at fourth floor runs swiftly diagonally
    upwards loaded with tons of "cake" (euphemism) going to the top of the CII
    incinerators and can be seen when one steps off the elevator (given that the elevator is working). Around the corner from the elevator on fourth floor was a room with contractor tools and gear. These great people construct and set up the machinery,
    piping and etcetera throughout the building (but tend to complain that the plant
    workers don't do anything). In my mind's eye there is a fifty five gallon drum
    of used oily gloves, rags and trash next to the elevator. That area of fourth floor
    is uninhabited on midnight shift.
    The City of Detroit no longer is the insurance agent for the WWTP but I don't
    know who is now.

  5. #5

    Default

    The new NEFCO biosolids facility next door is running at full capacity post fire. It
    contains eight centrifuges according to the spec sheets. The centrifuges probably
    have a life span of 50,000 hours before having to be replaced or rebuilt.
    I don't know if DTE has a permit to burn the biosolids at their coal burning plant
    across the Rouge River from the wastewater treatment plant. The more likely use
    for the biosolids is agricultural land application.

  6. #6

    Default

    Although the Complex II fourth floor would generally be unoccupied on
    midnight shift, fire detectors/alarms have been installed throughout the
    WWTP and are periodically checked. Complex II didn't have alarms? They
    were disabled since conditions were normally so smoky and fumy in
    there? Some workers at the complexes did have smoking habits based on
    the trash in the stairwells there. When EMA started managing there was
    an effort to keep the grounds clean and clear put in place - maybe this was
    being adhered to but a smoker forgot to make sure the cig was completely
    out before tossing it.

    Before Bing became mayor there were health workers at the plant - there
    was a plant clinic - they would check blood pressures and such, but they
    were pretty much the first ones to go, in the pre-bankruptcy days, before
    EMA came on board.

    Trash would pile up next to the complex elevator when it wasn't working
    which was fairly often. There would be a big trash takeout day from time
    to time. Here is where staff cuts may have been a problem. Besides this,
    even at full staff levels, plant cleanup was a difficult, dangerous, nasty,
    and thankless job which was done at minimum levels. The plant layout
    was not such as to make this work easier.

  7. #7

    Default

    The World Socialist Web Site has an article about the Complex II fire,
    with discussion by people more knowledgeable about the incident than
    I. It doesn't implicate a trash fire. This particular conveyor belt wasn't
    hosed down with water on a continual basis so far as I know. That may
    not have been possible given how the building was laid out but provisions
    for that could have been made when it was installed.

  8. #8

    Default

    Well, time for a few updates. It was my subjective impression that people around
    here are buying much more bottled water than previously - checked the web, and
    found, yes we are:

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2...al-opposition/

    This probably isn't due to just one factor such as the Flint Water Crisis. The above
    article references water comparing favorably to soft drinks. Since for whatever reason,
    we are buying more bottled water, and it is a very profitable and nonperishable
    product, stores now sell it by the pallet in visible locations.

  9. #9

    Default

    I haven't heard or read anything further about the Complex II fire.
    The incinerator hearths of Complex II that were in service at the time
    of the fire might have been destroyed if the incinerators were shut down
    rapidly. They are lined with specially cut refractory bricks which will
    shatter if they are allowed to cool too quickly.
    The Complex I incinerators were due to be closed forever later that
    month, but were upgraded and used instead of Complex II. Most
    of the time when possible the NEFCO biosolids facility is used to
    process wastewater solids.
    So if you go over the I-75 Rouge River bridge in the near future, check
    out the three tall wastewater treatment plant chimneys - they probably
    won't have the familiar yellow nitrogen oxide smoke smudges above them.

  10. #10

    Default

    The nitrogen oxide reacts with pollen grains so as to make them more
    allergenic for asthmatics, and probably even to cause asthma, though
    not much is known about the exact molecular mechanisms:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740364/

    So the yellow fumes will not be much missed. (Though they may be back
    at some point.) Wayne Soap, which used to generate a very foul odor in
    Delray, is not much missed either.

  11. #11

    Default

    http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2016/08/...eatment-plant/

    This is my unit. Weather conditions were hot and humid. A chlorine tank car
    came in that had an unusually high pressure as a direct result of the weather
    conditions. The chlorine tank car was opened fully for the hoses and piping for
    that tank car, subjecting these only to the high pressure. After about 24 hours,
    and possibly, again, due to the hot and humid conditions a split developed in one
    of the hoses. The unit now knows not to have that high of a pressure out there;
    it also knows that the other hose for the tank car has to be replaced too in the
    event of a leak - that one leaked also a little bit later on, but was a much smaller
    leak.

  12. #12

    Default

    Once upon a time I didn't work at the water department, but wondered
    what all that hard earned money was paying for. The water bill part seemed
    to be fair but the sewer bill part always seemed to be a little too high.

  13. #13

    Default

    I did want to go get a glass of water from the tap. Perhaps I should rethink that, but the option of not breathing... well.....

    Seems only a matter of time before we have a Detroit water/ Incinerator crisis. A preventable one no doubt.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpling View Post
    Well, time for a few updates. It was my subjective impression that people around
    here are buying much more bottled water than previously - checked the web, and
    found, yes we are:

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2...al-opposition/

    This probably isn't due to just one factor such as the Flint Water Crisis. The above
    article references water comparing favorably to soft drinks. Since for whatever reason,
    we are buying more bottled water, and it is a very profitable and nonperishable
    product, stores now sell it by the pallet in visible locations.
    The Flint Water Crisis is a large part of it.

    For those in the know (that the DWSD has more or less been privatized since the city's bankruptcy), we frankly don't trust the quality of water as there's no telling the extent in which the pumping and filtration process has been compromised in order to save money (the fact that 80% of the workforce was laid off doesn't help as far as suggesting otherwise), given it was all spearheaded by the same governor that spearheaded the "cost savings" in Flint (who BTW was DWSD's largest wholesale customer during Detroit's bankruptcy when the switch over to the Flint River took place).

    http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/new...-privatization

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 313WX View Post
    The Flint Water Crisis is a large part of it.

    For those in the know (that the DWSD has more or less been privatized since the city's bankruptcy), we frankly don't trust the quality of water as there's no telling the extent in which the pumping and filtration process has been compromised in order to save money (the fact that 80% of the workforce was laid off doesn't help as far as suggesting otherwise), given it was all spearheaded by the same governor that spearheaded the "cost savings" in Flint (who BTW was DWSD's largest wholesale customer during Detroit's bankruptcy when the switch over to the Flint River took place).

    http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/new...-privatization
    The Flint Water Crisis certainly was a large part. Stepping back, the bigger crisis is that we no longer trust our government. Seems like this started in the 1960s with the Vietnam war. I also blame the rise of the municipal-industrial state, where the government has become all things to all people -- so we no longer expect just a functioning government, but we expect the government to settle all disputes, distribute income, ensure someone's version of fairness. From this follows that controlling government is a means to wealth. True of corporations who lobby for favors. True for Unions who lobby for favors. True for workers who lobby for favors.

    The best solution is to get the government out of the business of picking winners & losers (think Solyndra).

    Beyond that, we also need to find out how to create a bi-partisan, functioning, transparent government. Or we can worry about bathrooms for the transgendered, or what some politician said 20 years ago when a microphone was on.

    The choice is ours.

  16. #16

    Default

    This is about the OP.

    http://www.macombdaily.com/article/M...WS06/120729602

    Mr. Martz is somewhat of a think-a-like with the OP. Their particular perspectives
    vary but they both have public and environmental interests deeply at heart. They
    are not in it for self-enrichment. The OP has not yet picked a favorite between
    Miller and Marrocco. Since Miller does not seem to have previously backed Martz
    against Marrocco (please correct me if I am wrong), and since millions are currently
    being devoted to the Miller vs. Marrocco race, it is my sense that Miller most
    represents bond issuing entities and certain construction firms backed by the
    bond issuing entities. I keep checking OP's social media to see which of these
    two he recommends voting for. (If I lived there I would cheerfully write in OP.)

  17. #17

    Default

    http://www.wxyz.com/news/downriver-w...-reported-sick

    http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/c...f-strange-odor

    Not good. I don't know what happened here but it is not the same issue as
    the water main break in Southwest Detroit that caused low water pressure
    at the WWTP and nearby areas:

    http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/in...sued_boil.html
    Last edited by Dumpling; January-16-17 at 01:49 AM.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpling View Post
    http://www.wxyz.com/news/downriver-w...-reported-sick

    http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/c...f-strange-odor

    Not good. I don't know what happened here but it is not the same issue as
    the water main break in Southwest Detroit that caused low water pressure
    at the WWTP and nearby areas:

    http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/in...sued_boil.html
    Thanks again Snyder!

    We noticed as well that our water (in the city proper) has been very cloudy even after running it for several minutes. Didn't have this problem until recently. It also has a foul odor to it (kind of like bacon grease).

    We don't drink it at all unless it's boiled (and use bottled water instead).

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 313WX View Post
    Thanks again Snyder!

    We noticed as well that our water (in the city proper) has been very cloudy even after running it for several minutes. Didn't have this problem until recently. It also has a foul odor to it (kind of like bacon grease).

    We don't drink it at all unless it's boiled (and use bottled water instead).
    Snyder's now in charge of DWSD? I live in Detroit proper and the water is tasteless, odorless, and clear as a bell. You sure you're not drinking out of the porcelain fountain in the bathroom?

  20. #20

    Default

    And just like Flint they are telling us to let the water run. So we get charged for water we can't use. And the lack of updates is always nice.

  21. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Honky Tonk View Post
    Snyder's now in charge of DWSD? I live in Detroit proper and the water is tasteless, odorless, and clear as a bell. You sure you're not drinking out of the porcelain fountain in the bathroom?
    It seems to depend on where you are. Here on the east side the water is clear and odorless. Friends on the southwest side (near the Rouge River) and Melvindale report cloudy smelly water.

  22. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EastsideAl View Post
    It seems to depend on where you are. Here on the east side the water is clear and odorless. Friends on the southwest side (near the Rouge River) and Melvindale report cloudy smelly water.
    I'm on the NE side.

  23. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 313WX View Post
    I'm on the NE side.
    There is obviously a problem with your water. It sounds like either a filtering problem, or a sewer line is leaching into the fresh water feed. Is it just your residence or are other residents around you effected as well? Do you have a neighborhood online blog called Next Door where you live? DWSD belongs and uses it as a sounding board to check for neighborhood problems. I would sign up, engage other neighbors, and try to bring the problem to light, to get them to do something about it. You're paying for clean, usable water. It's total B/S that this problem keeps going on.

  24. #24

    Default

    Here is the explanation that furthers my understanding of the situation the most:

    http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/d...ess-taste-odor

    To those who were affected, I offer apologies and regrets. Informally I understand
    that there is one person who quit though I don't know if it was the party most
    responsible for generating the problem that quit.

    For what it is worth the GLWA fresh water system for metro Detroit is considered
    to have overcapacity and the southwest water plant was one of the two that I
    believe are the most likely to be taken offline, the other being Port Huron, once
    the Karegnondi line is at full utilization.

    It is my opinion that if consumers received water that had turbidity in it, this
    water was more likely to carry some pathogenic organisms. Even if GLWA was
    aware at the time that this particular turbidity did not contain pathogenic
    organisms, various communities and the media needed to also be made aware
    of the situation before the product reached the consumers.

  25. #25

    Default

    GLWA was taking corrective action by stopping basin washing and adding
    powdered activated carbon at the Southwest treatment plant at about noon
    on Thursday January 12th. However IF turbidity had been entering the
    distribution system ahead of noon on Thursday AND the water contained
    bacteria then shelter dogs and others COULD have been getting sick from
    the bacteria even as late as Sunday January 15th. USUALLY for most
    water systems there is an automatic system monitoring the effluent
    turbidity as well as a person running periodic sample tests.

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