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  1. #1
    48009 Guest

    Default If you were 22-26 yo, would you move to Detroit RIGHT NOW? Why?

    In my other thread, a user posted:

    Detroit is going to come back like it or not. Younger people want to live and work in cities this is a nationwide trend. The days of buying a big house in the outer burbs are over few can afford that anymore,this shift toward walkable,bikable,transit cites will transform Detroit. The suburbs of Metro Detroit will become the new areas for those who cant afford to stay in Detroit.</span>
    The user is correct, college grads are moving to cities at a high clip. The problem for Detroit is that young people are moving to cities where hundreds of thousands of young college educated people like them already live, with countless bars and restaurants, safe nightlife, elite & competitive workforces, low unemployment rates. Detroit is more or less the complete opposite of all of those attributes. Remove your regional bias and ask yourself this question: why would someone 22-26 yo invest the prime of their life into a city that still requires so much work, when there are major cities just a few hours away that are already turn-key? Unless you don't have the option of working in Chicago, Indianapolis, San Francisco, DC, et al. I'm not sure why you'd sacrifice your prime to live in current Detroit. The perception Detroit is battling: Why would I be some billionaire investors' guinea pig in Detroit? They get rich, while I get to watch my friends on Facebook living it up in established hotspots?
    Last edited by 48009; September-08-13 at 06:44 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 48009 View Post
    In my other thread, a user posted:



    The user is correct, college grads are moving to cities at a high clip. The problem for Detroit is that young people are moving to cities where hundreds of thousands of young college educated people like them already live, with countless bars and restaurants, safe nightlife, elite & competitive workforces, low unemployment rates. Detroit is more or less the complete opposite of all of those attributes. Remove your regional bias and ask yourself this question: why would someone 22-26 yo invest the prime of their life into a city that still requires so much work, when there are major cities just a few hours away that are already turn-key? Unless you don't have the option of working in Chicago, Indianapolis, San Francisco, DC, et al. I'm not sure why you'd sacrifice your prime to live in current Detroit. The perception Detroit is battling: Why would I be some billionaire investors' guinea pig in Detroit? They get rich, while I get to watch my friends on Facebook living it up in established hotspots?
    I'm not in that age group (nor close) but people have a wide variety of preferences. There are a lot of living and working choices available in Detroit at a reasonable cost that don't exist in the same way in other major cities. There are plenty of places to eat and drink and be entertained for anyone who isn't obsessed with those activities. Some people are actually attracted to the idea of helping rebuild the city, and for those people the fact that Detroit is actually in need of rebuilding is a positive, not a negative. And of course if you don't want to rebuild the city no one is going to make you.

    That all said, metro Detroit isn't attractive to an awful lot of young people, precisely because the central city isn't what it should be. But it does seem as if the greater downtown area is becoming more attractive, and I think we are moving, slowly, toward a critical mass of population in the next several years, after which attracting more people should be easier. The key metric will be rents reaching the point where unsubsidized (or at least minimally subsidized) construction is feasible.

  3. #3

    Default

    Why would any 22-26 year old other than an overpaid techie want to move here to SF and pay an arm and a leg to live here? http://www.rentjungle.com/average-re...o-rent-trends/

  4. #4
    48009 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DetroiterOnTheWestCoast View Post
    Why would any 22-26 year old other than an overpaid techie want to move here to SF and pay an arm and a leg to live here? http://www.rentjungle.com/average-re...o-rent-trends/
    Perhaps...great weather, beautiful city, affluent surroundings, silicon valley, hyper-competitive job market, highly educated workforce, best restaurants in the world...stuff like that.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 48009 View Post
    Perhaps...great weather, beautiful city, affluent surroundings, silicon valley, hyper-competitive job market, highly educated workforce, best restaurants in the world...stuff like that.
    Great weather? Have you been to SF in the summer???

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 48009 View Post
    Perhaps...great weather, beautiful city, affluent surroundings, silicon valley, hyper-competitive job market, highly educated workforce, best restaurants in the world...stuff like that.
    Are you talking quality of life, or a high tech job brochure?

    Ummm and just what does a hyper-competitive job market get you in quality of life? 80 hour work weeks?

    What does a highly educated workforce do in their spare time... leave each other spellbound in "app algorithms"?

    Really what you describes sounds so shallow and pretentious... just how many nights does one in Silicon Valley eat out anyway? And what if you don't like Sushi or Napa or Somona Valley wines?

    And as for affluent surroundings... I guess living among million dollar housing just isn't what it used to be....
    http://valleywag.gawker.com/silicon-...-cos-513817096

    If that's the way you want to live in a high tech high tension world... go for it... but not everyone views that as living... life is too short...

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    Are you talking quality of life, or a high tech job brochure?

    Ummm and just what does a hyper-competitive job market get you in quality of life? 80 hour work weeks?

    What does a highly educated workforce do in their spare time... leave each other spellbound in "app algorithms"?

    Really what you describes sounds so shallow and pretentious... just how many nights does one in Silicon Valley eat out anyway? And what if you don't like Sushi or Napa or Somona Valley wines?

    And as for affluent surroundings... I guess living among million dollar housing just isn't what it used to be....
    http://valleywag.gawker.com/silicon-...-cos-513817096

    If that's the way you want to live in a high tech high tension world... go for it... but not everyone views that as living... life is too short...


    Or you could live in a city where the wages are not much higher than the Detroit metro all told and try to buy a house in that market. Vancouver.

    http://www.crackshackormansion.com/

  8. #8
    48009 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    Are you talking quality of life, or a high tech job brochure?

    Ummm and just what does a hyper-competitive job market get you in quality of life? 80 hour work weeks?

    What does a highly educated workforce do in their spare time... leave each other spellbound in "app algorithms"?

    Really what you describes sounds so shallow and pretentious... just how many nights does one in Silicon Valley eat out anyway? And what if you don't like Sushi or Napa or Somona Valley wines?

    And as for affluent surroundings... I guess living among million dollar housing just isn't what it used to be....
    http://valleywag.gawker.com/silicon-...-cos-513817096

    If that's the way you want to live in a high tech high tension world... go for it... but not everyone views that as living... life is too short...
    Real estate is expensive when a lot of high earners want to live there. When nobody wants to live somewhere, you get Detroit prices. I didn't know this was a foreign concept.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DetroiterOnTheWestCoast View Post
    Why would any 22-26 year old other than an overpaid techie want to move here to SF and pay an arm and a leg to live here? http://www.rentjungle.com/average-re...o-rent-trends/
    US Census, Population Ages 20-24

    Detroit 2000: 65,725
    Detroit 2010: 54,067
    Percent change: -17.7%

    San Francisco 2000: 56,054
    San Francisco 2010: 60,618
    Percent change: +7.5%

  10. #10

    Default

    In a heartbeat... I can see what Detroit will be in a few years, I probably won't be around to enjoy it but if I was in that age group... yes !

  11. #11

    Default

    Well I don't know about most "educated"... young people... but my sisters 2 kids went away to college... came back (5 years ago and last year)... found decent (not super great) jobs... bought houses that are AFFORDABLE (my niece got a nice house in Fraser for $89K)... are settling down with their new found spouse and girlfriend... and are planning on settling down here.... in super boring Detroit.

    I don't get it when some here post that everyone went away to a life of beer swilling at college... want to go find somewhere else to continue their beer swilling ways.

    Some young people DO get the urge to settle down... and living 1000 miles away from the rest of the family in some über cool social utopia is less important than starting a family near their existing family!

    Sorry 48009... I don't buy your example of living the American dream... You need to look at THE WHOLE PICTURE.... Not everyone wants to live 2 blocks from a mass transit system, and near a bar "where everyone knows your name"....

  12. #12
    48009 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    Well I don't know about most "educated"... young people... but my sisters 2 kids went away to college... came back (5 years ago and last year)... found decent (not super great) jobs... bought houses that are AFFORDABLE (my niece got a nice house in Fraser for $89K)... are settling down with their new found spouse and girlfriend... and are planning on settling down here.... in super boring Detroit.

    I don't get it when some here post that everyone went away to a life of beer swilling at college... want to go find somewhere else to continue their beer swilling ways.

    Some young people DO get the urge to settle down... and living 1000 miles away from the rest of the family in some über cool social utopia is less important than starting a family near their existing family!

    Sorry 48009... I don't buy your example of living the American dream... You need to look at THE WHOLE PICTURE.... Not everyone wants to live 2 blocks from a mass transit system, and near a bar "where everyone knows your name"....
    There are always going to be people more comfortable living close to where they grew up. Happening far less than it used to in Michigan, but it's not unheard of.

    It's not just "beer swilling" it's working with and being around hundreds of thousands of peers in a competitive city. When you go out for nightlife or to a gym it's full of college educated people from all over the country. If your nieces were looking for a college educated spouse, their options were exponentially more plentiful in Chicago. Even if you want to start a family in Michigan, there's still that period of time between 22 and mid to late 20s where Chicago, SF, Indy, Pitt, DC, NYC far are far appealing than Detroit.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 48009 View Post
    There are always going to be people more comfortable living close to where they grew up. Happening far less than it used to in Michigan, but it's not unheard of.

    It's not just "beer swilling" it's working with and being around hundreds of thousands of peers in a competitive city. When you go out for nightlife or to a gym it's full of college educated people from all over the country. If your nieces were looking for a college educated spouse, their options were exponentially more plentiful in Chicago. Even if you want to start a family in Michigan, there's still that period of time between 22 and mid to late 20s where Chicago, SF, Indy, Pitt, DC, NYC far are far appealing than Detroit.
    According to you. And to many other people. But, because people have different preferences, not to everyone. Just like some people would like living in Birmingham and some people wouldn't. It isn't that Birmingham doesn't have good points, it just isn't what everyone wants.

  14. #14

    Default

    Actually Detroit has a lot of great assets (I mean the region including the City, not just the City): waterfront, inexpensive housing, plenty of colleges and universities, Metro Parks, really good airline connections to other cities, sports teams, museums, DSO, great local music.

    The only thing we are lacking is the ability to live car free, which is appealing to more and more young adults now. And we are working on that; behind, but working.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    Well I don't know about most "educated"... young people... but my sisters 2 kids went away to college... came back (5 years ago and last year)... found decent (not super great) jobs... bought houses that are AFFORDABLE (my niece got a nice house in Fraser for $89K)... are settling down with their new found spouse and girlfriend... and are planning on settling down here.... in super boring Detroit.

    I don't get it when some here post that everyone went away to a life of beer swilling at college... want to go find somewhere else to continue their beer swilling ways.

    Some young people DO get the urge to settle down... and living 1000 miles away from the rest of the family in some über cool social utopia is less important than starting a family near their existing family!

    Sorry 48009... I don't buy your example of living the American dream... You need to look at THE WHOLE PICTURE.... Not everyone wants to live 2 blocks from a mass transit system, and near a bar "where everyone knows your name"....

    Some people want more than a marriage, a mortgage, and endless hours of couch sitting as soon as they get out of college. That doesn't mean they're "swilling beers". Maybe their goals are more ambitious than pumping out as many kids as possible.

    And for people who want that hurry-up-get-married-buy-a-house-get-knocked-up-I'm-almost-25-for-God's-sake lifestyle, Southeastern Michigan is already geared-up to accommodate you. The story has been (although less-and-less so), that if you dare to think different about your life, you're not welcome. Gistok, you might as well be the head of the unwelcoming committee.

    There are lots of different types of people. You seem to take an all-or-nothing approach, in that if not everyone wants to live in a sound urban neighborhood, then nobody can. Why the need to prescribe lifestyles from on-high?
    Last edited by ghettopalmetto; September-09-13 at 08:37 AM.

  16. #16

    Default Yes!

    I did move to Detroit when I was 25 (came from Toronto). I love it here. I get most of the amenities I had in Toronto (minus public transit, but hopefully M1 will be start of something bigger) for a fraction of the cost. My house is in a good neighbourhood in Downtown. I paid $60,000 when the same house would cost a million in a similar part of Toronto.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by samsonov View Post
    I did move to Detroit when I was 25 (came from Toronto). I love it here. I get most of the amenities I had in Toronto (minus public transit, but hopefully M1 will be start of something bigger) for a fraction of the cost. My house is in a good neighbourhood in Downtown. I paid $60,000 when the same house would cost a million in a similar part of Toronto.
    Same, down the the "everything's great but transit" and I came from Chicago, rather than TO.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ghettopalmetto View Post
    Some people want more than a marriage, a mortgage, and endless hours of couch sitting as soon as they get out of college. That doesn't mean they're "swilling beers". Maybe their goals are more ambitious than pumping out as many kids as possible.

    And for people who want that hurry-up-get-married-buy-a-house-get-knocked-up-I'm-almost-25-for-God's-sake lifestyle, Southeastern Michigan is already geared-up to accommodate you. The story has been (although less-and-less so), that if you dare to think different about your life, you're not welcome. Gistok, you might as well be the head of the unwelcoming committee.

    There are lots of different types of people. You seem to take an all-or-nothing approach, in that if not everyone wants to live in a sound urban neighborhood, then nobody can. Why the need to prescribe lifestyles from on-high?
    Ghettopalmetto... please go back and re-read my post... you're putting words into my mouth that I never said... that's not your usual modus operandi....

  19. #19

    Default

    I'm a 22-26 college grad who did move to Detroit. Been here a year now and love it so far. I lived downtown and am in the process of moving to Lafayette Park due to rising costs. Not too many large cities that you can live right downtown for under $1000. However, I grew up in the area and went to school in Michigan. I love Detroit, its sports teams and the state of Michigan. I lived in Ann Arbor prior to coming here. I wasn't intent on coming to Detroit but was recruited here. Hard to say whether I would have even considered Detroit if I wasn't here already. Five years ago, I probably would have taken the job and stayed in Ann Arbor.
    Last edited by Spartan; September-08-13 at 11:08 PM.

  20. #20

    Default

    Thanks for posting Spartan. I live in 1300 Lafayette and in the last year I've seen several younger kids move into our building and they are buying them since we don't allow renters. If you look at the occupancy rate of apartments in downtown Detroit they are filled. Why wouldn't someone young want to live downtown?

  21. #21
    48009 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeinmotown View Post
    Why wouldn't someone young want to live downtown?
    Most Michigan graduates are asking themselves "Do I want to live in Michigan?" And as of late, the answer at the top universities is more often than not no. Or, "If I want to live in a large city, why would I choose the most dangerous and illiterate one in the nation?"

  22. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 48009 View Post
    "If I want to live in a large city, why would I choose the most dangerous and illiterate one in the nation?"
    See, THAT is a great question. But if you were listening, you would know that it has already been answered multiple times. And your original question too, because IT IS A GOOD QUESTION. It evokes many varied and interesting responses. I would love to add my own experience of moving to Detroit when I was 24. But I will not, because as we all know now, you never intended for your questions to be answered.

  23. #23

    Default

    Who sets up these questions about coming to live in Detroit? Softball pitchers, for sure.

    Hello, I'm a 42DDD and I'm wondering if there would be any opportunities for me in Detroit.

  24. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 48009 View Post
    In my other thread, a user posted:



    The user is correct, college grads are moving to cities at a high clip. The problem for Detroit is that young people are moving to cities where hundreds of thousands of young college educated people like them already live, with countless bars and restaurants, safe nightlife, elite & competitive workforces, low unemployment rates. Detroit is more or less the complete opposite of all of those attributes. Remove your regional bias and ask yourself this question: why would someone 22-26 yo invest the prime of their life into a city that still requires so much work, when there are major cities just a few hours away that are already turn-key? Unless you don't have the option of working in Chicago, Indianapolis, San Francisco, DC, et al. I'm not sure why you'd sacrifice your prime to live in current Detroit. The perception Detroit is battling: Why would I be some billionaire investors' guinea pig in Detroit? They get rich, while I get to watch my friends on Facebook living it up in established hotspots?
    i think the whole premise of this is hilarious. sacrificing my prime to live here? when i bought my place last year i was 26 and moving from royal oak. i bought a historic home near downtown. i walk to my favorite bars and restaurants, i walk to eastern market on saturdays, i ride my bike along the riverfront each afternoon. what am i sacrificing exactly? detroit is rough around the edges for sure, but there was plenty happening here that appealed to me long before gilbert starting buying up buildings. id be here regardless, but in the last year there has been a ton of excitement around where i live and the property value has gone up 30-40k since i purchased. no sacrifice here.

  25. #25
    48009 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by southen View Post
    I think the whole premise of this is hilarious. sacrificing my prime to live here? when I bought my place last year I was 26 and moving from royal oak.
    So you've never lived anywhere outside of Michigan and feel you can speak on other cities and the opportunities they provide? O.K.

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