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  1. #1

    Default Farwell Building and Capitol Park conversions

    Reanimated Discussion began in 2013. You may want to jump to the latest discussion>>

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    Has there been any progress on the Farwell bldg. or the others in this park that are slated to apartment conversion? Plus does anyone have any link to pictures of the Tiffany dome that once covered the skylight in the Farwell? It was was blacked out during WW2. Nothing remains of it today.

  2. #2

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    Speaking of Capitol Park conversations, in 2008 a Capitol Park creature offered my friend "anything he wanted" for $7.50. I never understood how she game to that precise figure. He politely declined.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by poobert View Post
    Speaking of Capitol Park conversations, in 2008 a Capitol Park creature offered my friend "anything he wanted" for $7.50. I never understood how she game to that precise figure. He politely declined.
    $5 for a hit, tack on a 50% mark up which would allow your friend to negotiate down to $5. A win-win negotiation for all.

  4. #4

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    Who says there are no such thing as happy endings in Detroit?

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  6. #6

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    There's an afterhours there that needs to be shut down.

  7. #7

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    I was having lunch today in capital park and things are really turning around in the area.
    I did a 360 and you could see/tell , this is going to be something special.
    Then it hit me , What is going on with the Farwell building ?
    That's one of the last pieces, are they holding out? if so who are they?
    Whomever they are they are going to have a huge pay day.

  8. #8

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    Farwell is being redeveloped by Karp who has worked on two other buildings in CP. They are just finishing up their second project before moving onto their third. It is in the works though.

  9. #9

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    Capitol Park

    Quote Originally Posted by Detroitdave View Post
    I was having lunch today in capital park and things are really turning around in the area.
    I did a 360 and you could see/tell , this is going to be something special.
    Then it hit me , What is going on with the Farwell building ?
    That's one of the last pieces, are they holding out? if so who are they?
    Whomever they are they are going to have a huge pay day.

  10. #10

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    The Falwell Building was one of the most sumptuous buildings of the early 20th century. The inside was decorated by Tiffany & Co. New York. Sadly much of it was scrapped.

    There is an awesome 6 story octagonal light well from floors 3-8, which ironically you cannot see from the ground floor.

    The triple elevator doors were metalwork made in heaven, arguably the most sumptuous elevator doors anywhere in Detroit, sadly long since scrapped.

    The lobby Tiffany Chandelier (one of several) was sold by a previos owner, reputedly for $150,000, and shown here.

    This building will be a gem when restored, but sadly some of its' best features are gone.
    Attached Images Attached Images        

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    The Falwell Building was one of the most sumptuous buildings of the early 20th century.
    Summers when I was 11 and 12 I'd sometimes help my friend work at his dad's clothing and shoe stores on Griswold. I wasn't paid (it was like I was part of the family), but I always had fun. Something we did on our breaks was go to a video game arcade. I think it was in the Farwell building. I also remember a used book store we used to like to go to a door or two down. I think it was in the Farwell building too.

    I don't know what parts of the building were accessible back then, but I wish I paid more attention to the architecture. There was a lot I noticed, but surely much more I didn't. There was always so much to see, all day long!

    According to wikipedia the cornice was amazing. And from the same source, part of the deal to renovate the building will be to recreate it. I'm really hoping for a successful project. And really looking forward to getting the chance to go inside again. I'll pay more attention next time!
    Last edited by bust; December-10-15 at 01:53 AM.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by bust View Post
    According to wikipedia the cornice was amazing. And from the same source, part of the deal to renovate the building will be to recreate it. I'm really hoping for a successful project. And really looking forward to getting the chance to go inside again. I'll pay more attention next time!
    I think considering that the other two projects in the area by the same developer had their cornices restored that it is a safe bet that the farwell will get it's back as well. I just wish Gilbert would add cornices back to the DIME music building and the building on Woodward and State like he did with the Malcolmson.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    The Falwell Building was one of the most sumptuous buildings of the early 20th century. The inside was decorated by Tiffany & Co. New York. Sadly much of it was scrapped.

    There is an awesome 6 story octagonal light well from floors 3-8, which ironically you cannot see from the ground floor.

    The triple elevator doors were metalwork made in heaven, arguably the most sumptuous elevator doors anywhere in Detroit, sadly long since scrapped.

    The lobby Tiffany Chandelier (one of several) was sold by a previos owner, reputedly for $150,000, and shown here.

    This building will be a gem when restored, but sadly some of its' best features are gone.
    It must be painful for you to walk by any these abandoned buildings considering your knowledge of what they once were.

    That Tiffany fixture is downright gorgeous, it's a punch in the gut.

    Anyways, I want to thank you for posting so much info on these landmarks over the years.
    If Detroit was a museum, you my friend would be a curator..

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjlj View Post
    Capitol Park
    Thank you, Capitol Park by bad.

  15. #15

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    One of the most beautiful features of the building was he massive Tiffany dome that covered the skylight. It was blacked out during WW2, and has since disappeared.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bust View Post
    According to wikipedia the cornice was amazing. And from the same source, part of the deal to renovate the building will be to recreate it. I'm really hoping for a successful project. And really looking forward to getting the chance to go inside again. I'll pay more attention next time!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hybridy View Post
    Thanks. That is a great picture of the building. I was looking for a before picture to see the detail and to get an idea of what's possibly in store.
    Thanks

  18. #18

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    Now if we can only get infill between the Farwell and Malcomson building similar to what was ther before.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by gumby View Post
    Now if we can only get infill between the Farwell and Malcomson building similar to what was ther before.
    I know right, I was thinking the same thing , but as a city we're doing pretty damn good considering where we are coming from.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Detroitdave View Post
    Thanks. That is a great picture of the building. I was looking for a before picture to see the detail and to get an idea of what's possibly in store.
    Thanks
    Yes, thanks Hybridy!

    Quote Originally Posted by David L View Post
    One of the most beautiful features of the building was he massive Tiffany dome that covered the skylight. It was blacked out during WW2, and has since disappeared.
    I remember how my grandmother said Detroiters were forbidden from using outdoor lights during the war, and were instructed to hang black curtains to block any light from escaping their windows at night. And among many other defensive measures, they painted the beautiful gold leaf roof of the Fisher building black, saying the gold was too bright.

    Why? The official government explanation was Detroit was at high risk of a Japanese airplane attack and the lights (and gold roof) would help the Japanese target their bombs.

    Of course that was utter nonsense. There was no chance in hell a Japanese squadron could fly so far inland before they were intercepted. Nor any chance they'd try. I don't even think planes back then could carry enough fuel. Does anyone know how far into the country was the deepest Japanese airplane attack? I know it was not far at all.

    So it begs the question, why did the government incite such fear? I don't think they were working for the interests of the black curtain lobby. And I'm not one of those who is paranoid the government is out to get us. Far from it. But in this case I strongly suspect the government cynically used these everyday means of making us fear the Japanese to compel Americans to support the war effort. Does anyone else have a better explanation?

    It caused a great deal of unnecessary anxiety. And priceless architectural losses. The anxiety is now gone, if replaced by another. But those losses still stand as a reminder to question authority when what they tell us doesn't make sense.
    Last edited by bust; December-10-15 at 05:35 PM.

  21. #21

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    I wouldn't blame it all on the government... part of it was war jitters. Anyone during the war who saw the newsreels about London in flames, were trully afraid.

    Just go watch the movie Steven Spielberg's 1941... although it's a comedy... it did show a lot of truths about the hysteria at the time.

    Also many movie theatre's had their lobby chandeliers removed for fear that a dropped bomb would cause it to fall on patrons. That was not a mandate, but just jittery theatre owners. And there are many old movie palace in the USA whose chandeliers disappeared during the era, only to find parts of them hanging in private homes later.

    Yes they overreacted..... just like everything that was done post 9/11 was well thought out....
    Last edited by Gistok; December-10-15 at 05:38 PM.

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    The Falwell Building was one of the most sumptuous buildings of the early 20th century. The inside was decorated by Tiffany & Co. New York. Sadly much of it was scrapped.

    There is an awesome 6 story octagonal light well from floors 3-8, which ironically you cannot see from the ground floor.

    The triple elevator doors were metalwork made in heaven, arguably the most sumptuous elevator doors anywhere in Detroit, sadly long since scrapped.

    The lobby Tiffany Chandelier (one of several) was sold by a previos owner, reputedly for $150,000, and shown here.

    This building will be a gem when restored, but sadly some of its' best features are gone.


    That is stuff that we and future generations will never see again,as we transform into a disposable society.

    I was watching a show on public television about a city that had a architectural museum,which is basically every time they demolish a significant building they save pieces of it for display to show what was.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    I wouldn't blame it all on the government... part of it was war jitters. Anyone during the war who saw the newsreels about London in flames, were trully afraid.

    Just go watch the movie Steven Spielberg's 1941... although it's a comedy... it did show a lot of truths about the hysteria at the time.

    Also many movie theatre's had their lobby chandeliers removed for fear that a dropped bomb would cause it to fall on patrons. That was not a mandate, but just jittery theatre owners. And there are many old movie palace in the USA whose chandeliers disappeared during the era, only to find parts of them hanging in private homes later.

    Yes they overreacted..... just like everything that was done post 9/11 was well thought out....
    Thanks for your insight. And 1941 is a great recommendation. I remember really enjoying that, around the time I was playing video games in the Farwell building. It would be a good one to see again.

    Do you know where the idea to cover windows with black curtains came from? Was it a mandate? If not, how did the idea come to take such root? Who communicated the idea? Did the Fishers make the decision to destroy their beautiful roof themselves, or were they following orders? Whose idea was it to destroy the Tiffany skylight in the Farwell? Did any voices of reason provide a counter argument it was illogical to fear Japanese bombs in Detroit? Whose were those voices? Why did their common sense not prevail?

    I'm really curious how the mechanisms of propaganda / fearmongering work. It's still very relevant.

    P.S.: It's a strange place for this discussion, I admit.
    Last edited by bust; December-11-15 at 01:51 AM.

  24. #24

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    This article made some sense. https://thump.vice.com/en_us/article...us-techno-loftFor years I knew folks from 1217 (and the "Toys" building at the corner-Motormouth magazine threw a cool Christmas party there once)-a guy involved in early Techno, an ethnic band, a bunch of hardcore drug idiots in a band I avoided, some female activists living above, etc. (probably not the one who wrote this, but I did catch a bicyclist outside who we talked with and warned about a certain nearby afterhours-he most likely wrote the article). While the stairwells were not in great shape, many lofts were. How Detroit's "improvements" are affecting others is to be called into question. Especially, when I'm running into folks from my generation snuffing at all these new, fancy eateries that they can't even afford to dine in.

  25. #25

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    Lots of activity in Capitol Park, photos taken this afternoon. Has the Farwell Building construction started, appears it may have?

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