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  1. #1

    Default Detroit is a beautiful city

    Title: Detroit is a beautiful city.

    Now, all cities have some fine points, but I believe Detroit is special.

    In my opinion Detroit has one of the most beautiful landscapes in the country. In 1679 Father Louis Hennepin, a Frenchman was riding down the Detroit River on the ship Le Griffon.He cried out "this place is perfect." About 21 years later, the king of England sent Antoine de La Mothe Cadillac and his team to lay claim to the land. They saw what I see. It is true that the French were attracted to Detroit for its close proximity to the waterways for shipping was the main mode of transportation. What the French probably couldn't have imagined is how Detroit's landscape would expand and be developed.

    Detroit's riverfront is one of the best with its true picture beauty. The riverfront is ideal for walking and bike riding. The scenery is breathtaking with views of the Canadian skyline and the Ambassador Bridge. It's impressive how the riverfront has been developed and still kept its natural beauty. The Riverwalk is amazing with plenty of benches and a backdrop of some architectural jewels like the Renaissance Center, the soon to be renovated Cobo Hall, Veterans Memorial Building and the new Port Authority. The riverfront has Milliken State Park, many open plots of lands, great fishing spots, marinas, Hart Plaza and more.

    One aspect of the Detroit's landscape that people don't see are the salt mines which are roughly 1200 feet below ground and stretching almost 1400 acres and 50 miles of road.

    I have partied on boats parked at the many marinas that dot our riverbanks, from St. Jean Marina, to Harbortown, to Erma Henderson to the Riverfront Apts. I have sat on the 4 story tall hill that stands along the river and watched the ships go by.

    Detroit has its own island, affectionately called Belle Isle. The island was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted who also designed Central Park in New York City. It sits only minutes from downtown, it takes only minutes to cross and it offers the most fun you can have. As a youngster, it was always a joy seeing the waters of the Scott Fountain change colors, or sledding on the snow in the winter, or walking out on the docks to throw bread to the fish, or picnicking in the summer, or partying in the casino, or swimming at the beach, or just cruising around the island.

    Detroit is so unique, I know of a neighborhood that resembles Venice, France with water canals that come right up to the backyard garage. Our cities have beautiful homes designed in many styles from Tudor, Victorian, colonial and they come in sizes from mansion to small.

    Detroit has some really nice parks like Palmer Park with its tennis courts, a challenging golf course, Rouge Park with its Olympic size swimming pool and high dive platforms. Chandler Park for its Water Park and curvy streets. And, the many smaller parks that line various neighborhoods like Boston Edison or Rosedale Park, Broadstreet Park and GreenAcres Park, just to name a few. Once the heart of our of theater district, Grand Circus Park has two breathtaking fountains. And in the center of downtown is Campus Martius park which has a stage for performances in the summer and ice skating rink int he winter.

    I like that Detroit has one of the oldest and largest open-air markets in the country, Eastern Market. I used to go every Saturday and get this cherry and sour cream Danish and the guy would sneak and put some powdered sugar on top. I still go often since I'm trying to eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, plus I love seeing all the people.

    The new Midtown or old Cass Corridor has emerged. I like that they have renamed it Midtown. I have walked down Willis Street and bought some cookies, a funky hat an uplifting book, and ate a sandwich that was super healthy. Midtown has several noted events that highlight the area from the Noel night in the winter to the Dally in the Alley in the summer. Also the area is anchored with campuses for education, Wayne State Univesity and Center for Creative Studies, medical treatments, Henry Ford Health System and Detroit Medical Center, and our arts and museums with the Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit Historical Museum, Charles Wright Museum of African American History, and Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

    I like that Detroit has some ethnic communities, which makeup up the landscape of the city. Greektown is where I holler "opa" when I order the flaming cheese and Mexican Village is where I holler when I add too hot of a sauce. And, there are pockets on the Southwest side of the Detroit, where the Mexican influence is really prevailent.

    I guess the only thing Detroit doesn't have are mountains and Iím ok with that.

    I see the beauty in Detroit, just like Cadillac did and I'm sure others do, when we take the time.

    Submitted by
    Anthony Brogdon,
    Producer of a soon to be released documentary, The Great Detroit?

    For more information about the film go to www.strongdetroit.net or our funding campaign is www.indiegogo.com/Thegreatdetroitdocumentary

  2. #2
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    Default

    Many of Detroit's residential streets are extremely beautiful, and its residential housing stock, even today, is very good in large parts. With more trees they would be even better.

    The commercial streets, however, couldn't possibly be uglier. The commercial corridors really are a disaster, even in the best neighborhoods. It's mile after mile of abandoned or marginal retail, with the intersections given over to newer construction suburban-style gas stations or strip malls.

  3. #3

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    I agree with you that a lot of the buildings in Detroit are in bad shape but it would be impossible for a city who lost over 500,000 people in 20 years to not look like this. There are fewer people to operate a business and fewer people to support those business and fewer people to live in those homes.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bham1982 View Post
    Many of Detroit's residential streets are extremely beautiful, and its residential housing stock, even today, is very good in large parts. With more trees they would be even better.
    Sadly, the dutch elm disease of the 1960s & 70s destroyed a lot of the beauty of Detroit's residential neighborhoods.

  5. #5

    Default East English Village

    Quote Originally Posted by EastsideAl View Post
    Sadly, the dutch elm disease of the 1960s & 70s destroyed a lot of the beauty of Detroit's residential neighborhoods.
    I grew up on Bedford in East English Village (WHY do people today mis-identify that neighborhood as Morningside? It's not - its East English Village).

    When I was a young child, in the 1960's, the elm trees made a canopy over the street that filtered the sunlight and made it seem like you were in an enchanted forest. We lost all of those trees to Dutch Elm disease, but the neighborhood still has such beautiful homes.

    I come back to the area from time to time and it is sad to drive down those streets and see some of those homes boarded up, burned out or just abandoned.

    I'm hoping that some of the renewed interest in Detroit will also include this area of the city as well. At least they saved my old grade school - Clark Elementary. As far as I know, DPS is keeping that one opened.

  6. #6

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    Field Avenue, Islandview Village

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by takascar View Post
    I grew up on Bedford in East English Village (WHY do people today mis-identify that neighborhood as Morningside? It's not - its East English Village).
    I always assumed everything west of Outer Drive/Whittier was Morningside (including Bedford street). There's even a sign headed westbound on Mack/Warren/Harper that says "Welcome to Morningside" once you cross Outer Drive.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 313WX View Post
    I always assumed everything west of Outer Drive/Whittier was Morningside (including Bedford street). There's even a sign headed westbound on Mack/Warren/Harper that says "Welcome to Morningside" once you cross Outer Drive.
    That's true. Bedford IS in Morningside.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by getmoore View Post
    That's true. Bedford IS in Morningside.
    There is a map of the boundaries of East English Village right on the first page of their website:
    http://www.eastenglishvillage.org/

    The borders are Outer Drive/Whittier, Harper, Cadieux, and Mack. Bedford is certainly not in EEV. The name "East English Village" didn't come about until 1991 anyway, and the borders have never changed. Before that it was the acronym days - D.E.A.R. - Detroit East Area Residents. Other neighborhoods on the eastside had similar acronyms.

    It is a common misconception and it works to our detriment: our streets for the most part are quite intact and many blocks are downright beautiful. However everything west of Audubon in Morningside is heavily blighted. People often associate the streets with English names there with us - Berkshire, Devonshire, Haverhill, etc., and those streets are in terrible shape for the most part.

    Needless to say we're quick to dispel those misconceptions.

  10. #10

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    About 10-15 years ago, I would have said the streets from Beaconsfield eastward to Cadieux were all pretty decent.

    But yeah, the streets between Beaconsfield and Audubon have really gone downhill since them.

    About the only still intact neighborhoods/areas on the east side are EEV, Indian Village, the Barry Subdivision, and possibly West Village (excluding the areas where the McMansions were built in the late 90s/early 2000s).

    As far as the English streets, just about all of them from Alter road to Cadiuex are English (Yorkshire, Kensington, Grayton, etc.), yes?
    Last edited by 313WX; September-25-12 at 02:38 PM.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 313WX View Post
    About 10-15 years ago, I would have said the streets from Beaconsfield eastward to Cadieux were all pretty decent.

    But yeah, the streets between Beaconsfield and Audubon have really done downhill since them.

    About the only still intact neighborhoods/areas on the east side are EEV, Indian Village, the Berry Subdivision, and possibly West Village (excluding the areas where the McMansions were built in the late 90s/early 2000s).

    As far as the English streets, just about all of them from Alter road to Cadiuex are English (Yorkshire, Kensington, Grayton, etc.), yes?
    Pretty much. Except Three Mile Drive maybe

    You're correct in your eastside assessment, anyway. You could also include the strange little 48236 area of Detroit. Between St. John Hospital and Balduck Park still looks quite nice.

  12. #12

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    Detroit is indeed a beautiful city. In April I decided to trade the beauty of Detroit for this magnificant view from my balcony in beautiful Santa Fe, New Mexico. Enjoy!!!

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    Last edited by MidTownMs; September-25-12 at 02:47 PM.

  13. #13

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    ^ Helluva view and big change, weird to think. I guess thats their "great lake" type view.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bham1982 View Post
    Many of Detroit's residential streets are extremely beautiful, and its residential housing stock, even today, is very good in large parts. With more trees they would be even better.

    The commercial streets, however, couldn't possibly be uglier. The commercial corridors really are a disaster, even in the best neighborhoods. It's mile after mile of abandoned or marginal retail, with the intersections given over to newer construction suburban-style gas stations or strip malls.
    IAWTC. Detroit's commercial districts and primary arteries are for the most part... ugly. That was true even before they were abandoned. Some places look better than others, like Warren Avenue along the Cultural Center corridor. On the other hand, the smaller secondary roads weren't that bad (before abandonment) compared to other major cities.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Strong View Post
    I agree with you that a lot of the buildings in Detroit are in bad shape but it would be impossible for a city who lost over 500,000 people in 20 years to not look like this. There are fewer people to operate a business and fewer people to support those business and fewer people to live in those homes.
    More like 1 Million people over 50 years.

    Detroit's commercial corridors have been on the decline since the expressways took all the traffic. As a youngster, in the mid 70's, watching Grand River decline incrementally, as the Jeffries grew (first Livernois, then Schaefer), and within ten years riding the Grand River bus to high-school, it was impossible not to notice the abandonment.

    To me, the beauty lies (what's left of it) in those old buildings along Fenkell or Mack, Gratiot, Dexter, Grand River, Chene, etc, each with their own unique decoration, enamel, clay roof, Aztec design, 45 degree cut-out entrance, bake-lite exterior, or other unique decoration. Even though I'm almost too young to have seen most of those quarters actually bustling, driving down any one of those streets teases the imagination.

    And when that gets tiring, I like to escape to the Livingston Lighthouse tip of Belle Isle, where the Great Lakes take over.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Strong View Post
    Detroit is so unique, I know of a neighborhood that resembles Venice, France with water canals...
    Really?! Venice, Italy, sir.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dtowncitylover View Post
    Really?! Venice, Italy, sir.
    These posts are getting pretty good.

  18. #18

    Default

    Midtown is not a real negiborhood...

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MidTownMs View Post
    Detroit is indeed a beautiful city. In April I decided to trade the beauty of Detroit for this magnificant view from my balcony in beautiful Santa Fe, New Mexico. Enjoy!!!

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    Looks like the view from the balcony where they found Bin Laden.

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wheels View Post
    Looks like the view from the balcony where they found Bin Laden.

    Bin Laden was not found in the United States...

  21. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MidTownMs View Post
    Detroit is indeed a beautiful city. In April I decided to trade the beauty of Detroit for this magnificant view from my balcony in beautiful Santa Fe, New Mexico. Enjoy!!!

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    Although the mountains are very cool and Santa Fe is a nice town I would not give these views up for anything!
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Last edited by p69rrh51; September-27-12 at 09:18 PM.

  22. #22

    Default

    I agree - Detroit is beautiful!

    www.PicDetroit.com

  23. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGinthe313 View Post
    I agree - Detroit is beautiful!

    www.PicDetroit.com
    Thanks for sharing the video. I thought the up-close pictures of the buildings with their surrounding contexts were interesting. Also, I thought that your Sammy Davis musical accompaniment was just right.
    Last edited by Neilr; September-28-12 at 10:16 AM.

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