Hudson Site Proposal Interior
740 FOOT TOWER PROPSED FOR HUDSON SITE »


10 FUN THINGS TO DO IN DETROIT »



Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1

    Default 'Bold, new, and more democratic' vision unveiled for East Riverfront

    Planning & Development Department's plans for East Riverfront are released. More public park space added as reported by the Freep's John Gallagher...

    "The vision reverses a long-held presumption that the riverfront running east from the Renaissance Center would fill up with pricey residences and shops to boost the city's population and tax base. Instead, this new vision boldly accepts that the value of public access to the riverfront outweighs the value of a few more condos and shops.

    “The riverfront belongs to all Detroiters,” Maurice Cox, director of the City of Detroit Planning & Development Department, said of the new vision. “Thanks to the involvement of hundreds of residents, we have principles that frame an international riverfront that can be accessed and enjoyed by all.”

    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 9.04.08 PM.jpg
Views: 1161
Size:  45.9 KB
    "Three sites south of Atwater Street – which had been slated for private development – will become public park space instead. This will add nearly 8 acres of additional park space to the district.

    The planned Jos. Campau Greenway, which runs from Vernor down to the river, will receive new lighting, furnishings, paving and landscaping. The Beltline Greenway, to be located between Belleview and Beaufait, will connect from Kercheval to the Detroit River. Along with the Dequindre Cut, these greenways will connect the riverfront for thousands of residents living throughout several east-side neighborhoods.

    The Detroit RiverFront Conservancy also will break ground on an extension of the RiverWalk from Mt. Elliott Park to the Belle Isle Bridge along the former Uniroyal site. The RiverWalk extension will also connect to Gabriel Richard Park.


    http://www.freep.com/story/money/bus...46c718fecddbf8

  2. #2

    Default

    Also from the article, "Detroit Economic Growth Corp. will issue a Request for Proposals this week for a renovation of the Stone Soap building at 1490 Franklin." That's the building on the left. The rubble ruins of the legendary Rhinoceros Club can be seen on the right in this Google streetview.
    Name:  Rhino-Soap.jpg
Views: 1088
Size:  47.4 KB

    https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3334...8i6656!6m1!1e1

  3. #3

    Default

    Looks good. Run canals deep inside the city for boat access. Get rid of those freeways..

  4. #4

    Default

    Love that they want to fully connect the Riverwalk to Belle Isle. Very forward-thinking proposal here.

  5. #5

    Default

    Wow. I think we all just assumed that most of that area would be filled in with condos and apts. This amount of planning and the vision to return the riverfront to the people rather than private developers tells me that we have competent people at the helm, finally. It may take some time for all of this to come to fruition, but it's great to see they are finally going to connect the Riverwalk to Belle Isle via the old Uniroyal site. That basically gives us a continuous path bridge to bridge minus the Riverfront Condos.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lowell View Post
    The rubble ruins of the legendary Rhinoceros Club can be seen on the right in this Google streetview.
    Name:  Rhino-Soap.jpg
Views: 1088
Size:  47.4 KB

    https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3334...8i6656!6m1!1e1
    Ok, not to hijack the thread but what the hell happened to the Rhinoceros Club? I'm looking through the Freep archives and it seems to be a pretty hip place as late as 1998, but within 10 years its closed and hollowed out and then demolished? Did it suffer a fire? Did the failed casino district make it leave? Cool building too...

  7. #7

    Default

    I hope that these reclaimed areas will have a planned purpose. Just to be open space that is open to the public will do nothing to improve the area. For example, the area nearest Rivard Plaza has been fenced in. Ok, private developers can't build fancy high rises that most Detroiters can't afford, but what are Detroiters gonna do with land that's fenced in. Now, I assume that this area won't continue to be fenced in but what will go in its place? Will basketball or tennis courts go in the place? Will a skate park end up on one of these properties? That's planning. Leaving it untouched so that nature can take over these parcels would be a waste.

    Also, where will the "beach" area go? Why has that not been revealed? Sounds nice if it's going to be an actual beach. Get rid of the "hill" area that's an eyesore in my view and create the beach there with real sand and access to the water.

    Finally, I find it interesting that planning director Maurice Cox says that "the riverfront belongs to all Detroiters" yet the Orleans Landing development's starting prices are around $1300/month. How many Detroiters can afford that? So, these three parcels or 8 acres are now available to the public and not rich people. How many acres of the remaining riverfront are currently available? I'm not rich but it bothers me when people in Detroit want to keep rich people out of the city. New York City has thousands of millionaires who live in million dollar penthouses. Do the rest of New Yorkers fight to keep rich people out of their city? Only in Detroit do Detroiters not want rich people living in this city. It is this attitude that keeps Detroit from becoming a world class city in my view. And if one thinks that there is a racial tone to this, and there is, then consider that each of the three parcels taken away from the high-priced, high-rise developers were taken away from three black developers; one being Dave Bing and the other being Jerome Bettis.
    Last edited by royce; March-02-17 at 09:07 AM.

  8. #8

    Default

    I used to see that Stone Soap building every day when I worked nearby. It can't be redeveloped fast enough. But who owns the property with all the open rubble? I remember that as well. Is that city-owned? Horrible..

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hypestyles View Post
    But who owns the property with all the open rubble? I remember that as well. Is that city-owned? Horrible..
    I don't think the rubble is there anymore...if you look at more recent views it's just an empty lot.

  10. #10

    Default

    I believe that, back in 2015, the Downtown Development group sought proposes to renovate the Stone Soap Building. I am glad to see that plans are still coming along.

  11. #11

    Default

    Good to see. I really wanted to attend this meeting but could not. The Detroit river area has some of the best parts of the city. Really good energy down on the riverfront.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EGrant View Post
    Love that they want to fully connect the Riverwalk to Belle Isle. Very forward-thinking proposal here.
    Yes, this would be HUGE. Expanding access into the neighborhoods will also really help make those neighborhoods desirable. It even makes bike commuting to downtown jobs much more possible.

    I'm a big fan of it.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by renf View Post
    I believe that, back in 2015, the Downtown Development group sought proposes to renovate the Stone Soap Building. I am glad to see that plans are still coming along.
    You would think now that McCormack Baron Salazar would want to do something with this building, considering all or the Orleans Landing apartments on Riopelle are facing it. Also, the phase 2 they had planned was supposed to be on that block.

  14. #14

    Default

    It's alluded to on the map, but I've seen nothing in print...can anyone verify that the Conservancy will be building bridges across the cutoff parts of the Riverwalk so people don't have to backtrack to Atwater?

    The map key appears to suggest that new links will be built in Milliken State Park, across the St Aubin Marina opening, in front of Chene Park and at Atwater Beach to connect to the Riverwalk that picks back up at Stroh RiverPlace.

    I've been wanting those connections for years, especially in front of Chene Park. That connection would need to be built so access can be shut off during paid concerts. Better yet, they can use that space for premium up-close standing room for those concerts.

  15. #15

    Default

    Nice looking plan, some new green space and more pedestrian friendly is a bonus.

    The reality is there is plenty of empty space there to be able to do all kinds of things public and private.

  16. #16

    Default

    The design is so, so good. Makes me confident in the people in charge. Cut Jefferson down to a manageable street rather than highway, explicitly transit-oriented, and then a stepdown of development approaching public space along the river. Integrate historic structures where possible. So basic in so many cities, but often lacking in Detroit.

    Now boulevard-ize 375 and swing QLine phase 2 out to Belle Isle, and you've really got something stretching from midtown to Belle Isle. This entire arc should and can be the beautiful, connected, thriving, riverfront-oriented core of Detroit.

    Edit: I also love the additional greenways. Makes the riverfront into an amenity for anyone in neighborhoods in range of these paths.
    Last edited by Junjie; March-02-17 at 11:18 AM.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by middetres View Post
    It's alluded to on the map, but I've seen nothing in print...can anyone verify that the Conservancy will be building bridges across the cutoff parts of the Riverwalk so people don't have to backtrack to Atwater?

    The map key appears to suggest that new links will be built in Milliken State Park, across the St Aubin Marina opening, in front of Chene Park and at Atwater Beach to connect to the Riverwalk that picks back up at Stroh RiverPlace.

    I've been wanting those connections for years, especially in front of Chene Park. That connection would need to be built so access can be shut off during paid concerts. Better yet, they can use that space for premium up-close standing room for those concerts.
    Couldn't agree more.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Colombian Dan View Post
    Looks good. Run canals deep inside the city for boat access. Get rid of those freeways..
    The plan has always been to build across the Uniroyal property once it has been remediated.

    The best change to me are the plans to put Jefferson on a diet.


    http://www.dailydetroit.com/2017/03/...et-bike-lanes/

  19. #19

    Default

    I see that Daily Detroit found out where the beach will go. http://dailydetroit.com.

  20. #20

    Default

    If someone really wants to connect people to the river, make the "Campau Connector" a real street with car, bike, and pedestrian access. It would eliminate the superblock that currently exists. It could start at Macomb Street and be a one-way heading south to Jefferson.

    Oh, and while we're talking about improving Jefferson and the riverfront, let's get rid of Larned Street altogether, from Rivard to Mt. Elliot, and use it as an alley an parking lots for buildingw along Jefferson, freeing up surface parking lots that could be developed for mixed-use developments.
    Last edited by royce; March-02-17 at 02:37 PM.

  21. #21

    Default

    Hopefully whatever gets built on the surface lots east of the ren cen will also open up the river walk a bit more. With the white collar lunch crowd, bikers, runners and summer tourists it gets squeezed at times...it is an amazing amenity to have

  22. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by royce View Post
    I hope that these reclaimed areas will have a planned purpose. Just to be open space that is open to the public will do nothing to improve the area. For example, the area nearest Rivard Plaza has been fenced in. Ok, private developers can't build fancy high rises that most Detroiters can't afford, but what are Detroiters gonna do with land that's fenced in. Now, I assume that this area won't continue to be fenced in but what will go in its place? Will basketball or tennis courts go in the place? Will a skate park end up on one of these properties? That's planning. Leaving it untouched so that nature can take over these parcels would be a waste.

    Also, where will the "beach" area go? Why has that not been revealed? Sounds nice if it's going to be an actual beach. Get rid of the "hill" area that's an eyesore in my view and create the beach there with real sand and access to the water.

    Finally, I find it interesting that planning director Maurice Cox says that "the riverfront belongs to all Detroiters" yet the Orleans Landing development's starting prices are around $1300/month. How many Detroiters can afford that? So, these three parcels or 8 acres are now available to the public and not rich people. How many acres of the remaining riverfront are currently available? I'm not rich but it bothers me when people in Detroit want to keep rich people out of the city. New York City has thousands of millionaires who live in million dollar penthouses. Do the rest of New Yorkers fight to keep rich people out of their city? Only in Detroit do Detroiters not want rich people living in this city. It is this attitude that keeps Detroit from becoming a world class city in my view. And if one thinks that there is a racial tone to this, and there is, then consider that each of the three parcels taken away from the high-priced, high-rise developers were taken away from three black developers; one being Dave Bing and the other being Jerome Bettis.
    The average New Yorker has asess to mAny of the same amenities in the city as the millionaires have but I'm Detroit the amenities would be privatized by and only for the rich. Look at how downtown is turning out to be. All of the restaurants that had opened are expensive to the average person daily taste

  23. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by royce View Post
    If someone really wants to connect people to the river, make the "Campau Connector" a real street with car, bike, and pedestrian access. It would eliminate the superblock that currently exists. It could start at Macomb Street and be a one-way heading south to Jefferson.

    Oh, and while we're talking about improving Jefferson and the riverfront, let's get rid of Larned Street altogether, from Rivard to Mt. Elliot, and use it as an alley an parking lots for buildingw along Jefferson, freeing up surface parking lots that could be developed for mixed-use developments.
    Not sure I agree with removing Larned street, but certainly making it more accessible/narrower would be nice.

    Those near-east side superblocks have really stifled that part of town. It's so bland and desolate over there. I'm really hoping the city has plans to remove this district and restore the street grid that existed in that area before Elmwood Park was developed. It's a huge area, I'm surprised it ever happened in the first place. But replacing the city with apartments did nothing to improve that area. It would be much better served with through-streets, corner stores/markets/commercial buildings mixed in. While I welcome the Campau Greenway, I agree with royce that it would be much better as an actual through-street.

  24. #24

    Default

    For your reference, the plan PDF is posted at:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/k0t8hqir00...FINAL.pdf?dl=0

    and they have a website at:
    http://www.yourdetroiteastriverfront.org

    The PDF has a good number of slides and maps of locations and visions behind specific places. Here are some selections:

    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-03-03 at 9.52.51 AM.jpg
Views: 607
Size:  95.7 KB
    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-03-03 at 9.53.03 AM.jpg
Views: 612
Size:  117.7 KB
    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-03-03 at 9.53.43 AM.jpg
Views: 608
Size:  70.9 KB
    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-03-03 at 9.53.57 AM.jpg
Views: 672
Size:  76.5 KB
    Last edited by Gsgeorge; March-03-17 at 09:56 AM.

  25. #25

    Default

    This looks excellent. Really pretty much all I was hoping for. Making the riverfront all open to public access should make that whole area much more lively, and therefore more valuable to residential and commercial developers. And rehabbing the Stone Soap building is another step in the direction of preservation and productive reuse of the older industrial buildings down there, which should be a major focus of the redevelopment efforts. This could all be a major win for the east side, and the city as a whole.

    To finally see some plans for cutting the Riverwalk through the Uniroyal site, and thus connecting it to Belle Isle, is great. But the rendering makes it look like it's going through a forest (and that site is certainly currently the opposite of forested). Any idea what, if anything, is now being planned for the rest of that site?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Instagram
BEST ONLINE FORUM FOR
DETROIT-BASED DISCUSSION
DetroitYES Awarded BEST OF DETROIT 2015 - Detroit MetroTimes - Best Online Forum for Detroit-based Discussion 2015

ENJOY DETROITYES?


AND HAVE ADS REMOVED DETAILS »





Welcome to DetroitYES! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
DetroitYES! is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to DetroitYES! [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.