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  1. #26

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    Where? If this were true, wouldn't it be on all Shorpy-marked photos? If so, where is it on this one other than in the corner?http://www.shorpy.com/node/21698?size=_original#caption


    I see two parts of the water mark just left of the ramp that goes down to the water on the right side of the photo. It's on the water just above the last boat on the dock.
    Last edited by Farwell; February-11-17 at 07:26 PM.

  2. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by dtowncitylover View Post
    Who were these people? Their names? Where were they going? What did they do? Where did they live? Do their descendants still live in metro Detroit? What was Detroit to them?

    I love these photos because you can really see the detail in just about everything. It's simply amazing.
    I wish I could offer a time machine into this era but I can't. The closest I can approximate is the film Kafka. It runs 94 minutes and has nothing to do with Detroit but matches the atmosphere of the period very closely.

    Bookmark it if you don't have the time right now. It's well worth watching.

  3. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcole View Post
    Where? If this were true, wouldn't it be on all Shorpy-marked photos? If so, where is it on this one other than in the corner?http://www.shorpy.com/node/21698?size=_original#caption
    Dave puts the Shorpy watermark on each photo, as a way to show where the photo came from. Although many of the photos start at the LoC, the Shorpy folks 'adjust, restore and rework' the photos to clear them up. The process is described in the left column near the bottom of the site, under 'About the photos'. They've had people resell the restored photo as their own. Thus they watermark, often in odd or unexpected places.

  4. #29

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    From back in the days when people used their legs to get around instead of cars....

  5. #30

  6. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3d123 View Post
    The odd-looking building at the corner was built as First Baptist Church (congregation still exists, now on Southfield just north of 8 Mile), but had been converted to commercial use long before the time of this picture. It would soon be torn down and replaced by the Dime Building.

  7. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastsideAl View Post
    The odd-looking building at the corner was built as First Baptist Church (congregation still exists, now on Southfield just north of 8 Mile), but had been converted to commercial use long before the time of this picture. It would soon be torn down and replaced by the Dime Building.
    I think the congregation was still there when the photo was taken. Their new First Baptist Church building on Woodward wouldn't get built until 1909. They did have retail shops around the outside of the church. They could rent those out to raise money. Mariners church had the same setup.

  8. #33

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    The fine detail on these photos is the result of using big negatives, probably at least 8 by 10. Cell phone photos are convenient, but they don't even begin to approach the detail and subtle contrast gradations provided by large format film cameras.

  9. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Burnsie View Post
    The fine detail on these photos is the result of using big negatives, probably at least 8 by 10. Cell phone photos are convenient, but they don't even begin to approach the detail and subtle contrast gradations provided by large format film cameras.
    Yes, the caption on the Woodward photo says "8x10 inch dry plate glass negative."

    The small grain size of the silver nitrate used is another factor. Years ago I recall reading that this is why black & white was preferred over color film for astrophotography. Silver nitrate gave much better detail.

    Of course everything's changed now with digital photography.

  10. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by archfan View Post
    I think the congregation was still there when the photo was taken. Their new First Baptist Church building on Woodward wouldn't get built until 1909. They did have retail shops around the outside of the church. They could rent those out to raise money. Mariners church had the same setup.
    The church was in a building at Cass and Temple (then called Bagg) from 1875 to 1912 (when they merged with the congregation that was in the building on Woodward). That location was later the site of the Ft. Wayne/American Hotel. The old church at Fort and Griswold was converted to commercial use and the former sanctuary used as an auditorium for lectures, etc. It was known as the Walker Block during that time.

    Here is an old thread on the Cass church:
    http://www.detroityes.com/mb/showthr...rch-located-at
    Last edited by EastsideAl; February-25-17 at 05:15 PM.

  11. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastsideAl View Post
    The church was in a building at Cass and Temple (then called Bagg) from 1875 to 1912 (when they merged with the congregation that was in the building on Woodward). That location was later the site of the Ft. Wayne/American Hotel. The old church at Fort and Griswold was converted to commercial use and the former sanctuary used as an auditorium for lectures, etc. It was known as the Walker Block during that time.

    Here is an old thread on the Cass church:
    http://www.detroityes.com/mb/showthr...rch-located-at
    So that must be the church completed in 1863, and it was converted in 1875 when they moved to Cass?

  12. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by archfan View Post
    So that must be the church completed in 1863, and it was converted in 1875 when they moved to Cass?
    Yes, I believe that is correct.

  13. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3d123 View Post
    How interesting that another African American gentleman shows up at the right time! Bottom left, standing on the corner. It even appears he's gazing towards the camera.

  14. #39

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    For those too young to remember it, Shorpy shows us a beautiful 1909 picture of another one of Detroit's great architectural losses, the Fort St. Union Depot, demolished in 1974.

    http://www.shorpy.com/node/21802?size=_original#caption

  15. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastsideAl View Post
    For those too young to remember it, Shorpy shows us a beautiful 1909 picture of another one of Detroit's great architectural losses, the Fort St. Union Depot, demolished in 1974.

    http://www.shorpy.com/node/21802?size=_original#caption
    That could have been a signature building in the city if it was still standing. What a shame it was torn down.

  16. #41

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    The same photo is on Union Depot's Wikipedia page.

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