Detroit Swag-o-mania

A silhouetted bronze sculpture of Poseidon frames the illuminated main entrance to the Detroit Institute of Arts during Detroit's annual Delectricity festival of lights. Stretching along Woodward Avenue through the heart of Detroit's Cultural Center the celebration is a growing and popular two-night event.

READ MORE »


New? Join DetroitYES»

DISCUSSING ALL THINGS DETROIT-WINDSOR SINCE 1999

ENJOY DETROITYES?


AND HAVE ADS REMOVED DETAILS »

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 97
  1. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hypestyles View Post
    GM owns a hotel? where?
    GM owns the Marriot and the Marriot Courtyard downtown. JW Marriot once sat on the board of GM. So a hotel had ownership of GM at one time!

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
    When my friend got married about a year and a half ago the rate for the bridal party to stay there was in the $100/night range on what should have been a fairly busy weekend for them. At that rate I would guess that the hotel is averaging annually less than $15,000/room in revenue... Certainly not a compelling case to convince the owners to throw $20 million into a hotel with a poor location.
    But you fail to realize there are several hundred rooms there, two restraunts, bars, meeting rooms, ballrooms, and a hotel store. Ever buy anything in a hotel? Say a meal, a bottle of scope, or hold a wedding? They make tons of additional dollars that way. Rooms are almost a loss leader for these places. 1.5 years ago the economy was not as solid as it is now (its still weak BTW) so the party was able to swing a good rate for several rooms as well as having it at a time where there were probably 100's of rooms empty.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by XDetroitr View Post
    I'm not surprised by the news. My family used to meet at the Hyatt's restaurant on the 2nd floor for Sunday brunch. We stopped going a few years ago because the clientele was getting a little too rowdy. Large groups of (presumed) Detroiters not always behaving politely in public. Sadly, the quality of their brunch buffet also dropped noticeably.
    Why would you 'presume' they were Detroiters? Hell, quit hiding behind your veiled racism and just come out and state that you don't like eating around black people.

    Thank you for putting your bigotry on display, now I can ignore your future contributions to this board.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    5,813

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hypestyles View Post
    GM owns a hotel? where?
    When they bought the Renaissance Center from Highgate back in the 1990s, the (at that time) Westin Hotel was part of the package. Eventually it became a Marriott because the head of Marriott was on the GM Board.... but GM owns the building.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,288

    Default

    Well, I don't know what his agenda is but for the record I am black and am getting increasingly done with obnoxious behavior I am seeing from black and white and green in public, especially at restaurants!

    Loud inappropriate mobile phone conversations, cursing in front children, yours and their own, and rowdy behavior! Just rudeness in general in settings where you think some level of decorum should be present ala a Sunday brunch.

    I asked to be moved if possible, or I just never come back to that establishment if it is a pattern. General manners in general are just down these days...
    Quote Originally Posted by jt1 View Post
    Why would you 'presume' they were Detroiters? Hell, quit hiding behind your veiled racism and just come out and state that you don't like eating around black people.

    Thank you for putting your bigotry on display, now I can ignore your future contributions to this board.
    Last edited by Zacha341; May-08-12 at 06:45 AM.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,288

    Default

    I've always love this building. Beautiful sunset reflections seen on evenings from it coming east from off the hill of Michigan (from Telegraph going east where Michigan angles downward towards Detroit)... I enjoyed the revolving bar on the top floor when it was in operation.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gannon View Post
    One of the best examples of environmental architecture, that building is...best reflections of both sunrises and sunsets I've ever seen.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    149

    Default

    A few more comments from someone who is a frequent business traveler:

    The Hyatt Dearborn was built in a different era. The hotel is massive and its built for conventions and large meetings. Back in the the late 70's and 80's these large business conventions in large hotels in generic locations were all the rage. Simple, you'd fly people in and have these massive meetings. At some point they started having them in places that were desirable to travel to and have other features outside of the hotel. Then in the past decade conventions and the meeting business are down, especially even more so in the auto industry. There just aren't that many of these types of events that are going to regularly fill an 800 room hotel in Dearborn.

    The Hyatt Dearborn can't compete for the convention / large business meetings like places in Florida, Vegas, Dallas / Ft. Worth, Chicago, or Atlanta. Plus now the downtown Detroit hotels offer a better overall experience.

    In addition the Hyatt Dearborn is no longer "the place" for business travelers. Hyatt just doesn't have the brand and loyalty program like Starwood, Hilton, or Marriott.

    All isn't lost, The Henry is actually doing quite well now that its been rebranded and affiliated with Marriott. The price / naming is more on par with the market and it does draw a lot of business travelers and meetings. In addition it is a part of the Marriott rewards/loyalty program.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zacha341 View Post
    Well, I don't know what his agenda is but for the record I am black and am getting increasingly done with obnoxious behavior I am seeing from black and white and green in public, especially at restaurants!

    Loud inappropriate mobile phone conversations, cursing in front children, yours and their own, and rowdy behavior! Just rudeness in general in settings where you think some level of decorum should be present ala a Sunday brunch.

    I asked to be moved if possible, or I just never come back to that establishment if it is a pattern. General manners in general are just down these days...
    I agree that loud, obnoxious behavior is unacceptable and will also cause me to leave an establishment. My issue lies with hsi presumption that they were Detroiters. Is this based upon behavior or color of skin. Either way I could do without someone who automatically concludes that obnoxious, black or black and obnoxious people must be from Detroit

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitPlanner View Post
    But you fail to realize there are several hundred rooms there, two restraunts, bars, meeting rooms, ballrooms, and a hotel store. Ever buy anything in a hotel? Say a meal, a bottle of scope, or hold a wedding? They make tons of additional dollars that way. Rooms are almost a loss leader for these places. 1.5 years ago the economy was not as solid as it is now (its still weak BTW) so the party was able to swing a good rate for several rooms as well as having it at a time where there were probably 100's of rooms empty.
    I'm still not convinced. Using the 60% occupied benchmark that I have heard cited as the break even point for hotels, this place is losing money.

    But even if they were generating $20-$25K/room annually the math still doesn't work. It would take them a couple years of total revenue (in an unstable hotel market) just to recoup the upgrade costs, forget about general operating costs. Then, as I said before, factor in that they are likely losing money... I'm sure that Hyatt asking for a $20M upgrade was quickly dismissed by the owners.

    I'd guess that the hotel is far too large to give it much of a future as a luxury hotel. It would need to be able to increase occupancy and/or charge higher rates in order to make an expensive upgrade make sense. Wonder how much it would cost to demolish it and build another hotel?

  10. #35
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Here is the master review thread on Flyertalk, arguably the best website and opinions by business travelers:

    http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/hyatt...er-thread.html

    The Hyatt Dearborn generally got mediocre reviews and as mentioned on many occasions it was rather empty at times.

    There are some pictures of the rooms on Page 2. While the room and bathroom appear to be in good condition it was due for some updates in some areas. Particularly in comparison to other Hyatts and competitor properities.

    Hyatt likely was requesting that they put flat-screen TVs, updated workstation/desks, perhaps a different type of shower/tub in each room. In addition to upgrades to the common areas.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,457

    Default

    Don't feel too bad for the Hyatt people; Hyatt is owned by the Pritzgers who also own TransUnion and all its subsidiaries, and if you work for them and go on a business trip and book there, they charge you full rack rate.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,515

    Default

    Now that's a modern building I hate to see decline...

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7,515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Whitehouse View Post
    Now that's a modern building I hate to see decline...
    I can't believe I'm about to speak a word in favor of Mayor Orville Hubbard, but here goes: At least he understood how traditional cities worked. When they showed him the design of the Hyatt, he was furious, barking out, "They've turned their BACK on Michigan Avenue!"

    Despite the source, it's a fair point. Modernism doesn't exist in a vacuum. It's seldom human scale. It seldom integrates itself well with existing thoroughfares. It demands to be seen from a distance, mighty and terrible, like a boss' big desk at the back of a sprawling executive office. And you achieve that by setting it back behind acres and acres of parking.

    As I posted earlier about Troy, I wonder what we'll use these huge buildings set willy-nilly in the middle of huge parking lots for in the future ...

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,123

    Default

    This is a complaint about city planning and land values, not about an architectural style. There are certainly plenty of modernist buildings in Manhattan or Boston that are integrated into the street grid and not surrounded by parking. On the other hand, in suburban areas, or areas where land is cheap and the local government uninterested or incompetent, you generally get isolated pods with asphalt.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7,515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mwilbert View Post
    This is a complaint about city planning and land values, not about an architectural style. There are certainly plenty of modernist buildings in Manhattan or Boston that are integrated into the street grid and not surrounded by parking. On the other hand, in suburban areas, or areas where land is cheap and the local government uninterested or incompetent, you generally get isolated pods with asphalt.
    To a certain extent, you are correct. But don't let's forget that modernism took off after World War II, during the great suburban exodus in the United States and the rise of car culture. For a clearer definition of what's called "magazine architecture," refer to Stewart Brand's "How Buildings Learn." You may not always agree with Brand's take on modernism, but it's a fascinating view of how architecture changed after World War II.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jt1 View Post
    I agree that loud, obnoxious behavior is unacceptable and will also cause me to leave an establishment. My issue lies with hsi presumption that they were Detroiters. Is this based upon behavior or color of skin. Either way I could do without someone who automatically concludes that obnoxious, black or black and obnoxious people must be from Detroit
    My comment about "presumed" Detroiters was not meant to offend. Only that Dearborn has a relatively small African-American population and the Detroit border is within a mile of the Hyatt. Therefore, the likelihood of the clientele being from Detroit is quite high.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7,515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by XDetroitr View Post
    My comment about "presumed" Detroiters was not meant to offend. Only that Dearborn has a relatively small African-American population and the Detroit border is within a mile of the Hyatt. Therefore, the likelihood of the clientele being from Detroit is quite high.
    I'm not offended by the characterization. When I encounter rude, red-faced, beefy-looking people at Vivio's or outside the ballpark, I kinda presume they're suburban.

    Assholes everywhere, my friend...

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7,515

    Default

    Given the traditionally stark differences in ethnic makeup between Detroit and its suburbs, I kinda understand the remark. Then again, the latest census proves that things are more complicated now. But, yeah, I feel ya, jt1: At a certain point, a dispassionate educated guess ends and some serious cultural chauvinism, if not outright racism, begins with this sort of stuff.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,007

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitPlanner View Post
    But you fail to realize there are several hundred rooms there, two restraunts, bars, meeting rooms, ballrooms, and a hotel store. Ever buy anything in a hotel? Say a meal, a bottle of scope, or hold a wedding? They make tons of additional dollars that way. Rooms are almost a loss leader for these places. 1.5 years ago the economy was not as solid as it is now (its still weak BTW) so the party was able to swing a good rate for several rooms as well as having it at a time where there were probably 100's of rooms empty.

    Hermod's Law (based on 25 years of road warrior experience): Never, ever eat at the hotel restaurant!

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Detroitnerd View Post
    At a certain point, a dispassionate educated guess ends and some serious cultural chauvinism, if not outright racism, begins with this sort of stuff.
    Probably about the point where it becomes necessary to mention that the offending parties are black... I mean "Detroiters".

    Here's a test:

    I'm not surprised by the news. My family used to meet at the Hyatt's restaurant on the 2nd floor for Sunday brunch. We stopped going a few years ago because the clientele was getting a little too rowdy. Large groups of people not always behaving politely in public. Sadly, the quality of their brunch buffet also dropped noticeably.
    I changed one little part of his original statement. Does the statement still make sense? Is the reasoning for his family not continuing to go to Sunday brunch at the Hyatt any less clear now? Did it ever matter what city the loud, obnoxious people lived in who crashed Sunday brunch at the Hyatt?

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7,515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
    Probably about the point where it becomes necessary to mention that the offending parties are black... I mean "Detroiters".

    Here's a test:

    I changed one little part of his original statement. Does the statement still make sense? Is the reasoning for his family not continuing to go to Sunday brunch at the Hyatt any less clear now? Did it ever matter what city the loud, obnoxious people lived in who crashed Sunday brunch at the Hyatt?
    Good job. I understand. Even mentioning the race changes the entire meaning of the statement.
    Last edited by Detroitnerd; May-08-12 at 04:32 PM.

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Detroitnerd View Post
    Good job. I understand. Even mentioning the race changes the entire meaning of the statement.

    But then I don't have any qualms about getting angry about drunken, idiotic, white suburbanites trashing downtown on Opening Day. And I can say that with a clear conscience. But why is that? Is it because I'm white? Is it because they're enacting a kind of chauvinism? Is it because the whites have not historically been the victims of racism? I think that's what confuses me.
    Well, it shouldn't matter there either (am I understanding your point correctly?). Drunk people trashing downtown are drunk people trashing downtown. Them being white doesn't make a difference for what they did. And people of any race can get drunk and trash downtown.

    However, "white" is the default for American so... there really isn't a stigmatization of a whole class of people by saying "drunk white suburbanites trashed downtown". If anything, that statement is more of a distinction to say that the people who trashed downtown on opening day aren't Detroiters and they aren't black (Latino, Arab or Asian) -- or some other disenfranchised class of people. It's like saying "the terrorists who destroyed the Oklahoma City federal building were white". What that statement is really saying is that "the terrorists who destroyed the Oklahoma City federal building were not Muslims of Arab descent."

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,344

    Default

    Name:  bluesbrothergcx8.jpg
Views: 465
Size:  22.5 KB

    Rowdy clientele at Hyatt Sunday brunch.

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Downriviera View Post
    Name:  bluesbrothergcx8.jpg
Views: 465
Size:  22.5 KB

    Rowdy clientele at Hyatt Sunday brunch.
    Best thing ever.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
    I'd guess that the hotel is far too large to give it much of a future as a luxury hotel. It would need to be able to increase occupancy and/or charge higher rates in order to make an expensive upgrade make sense. Wonder how much it would cost to demolish it and build another hotel?
    Maybe its time for some of the floors to be turned into condos or apartments? U of M is hinting on converting the empty buildings along the mall's western ring road into student housing in order to link the mall with the campus. Why not expand the project?
    Last edited by DetroitPlanner; May-10-12 at 10:11 PM.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •