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  1. #1
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    Default Future of Lakeside Mall

    What do you think will happen to Lakeside mall since the introduction of the Mall at Partridge Creek?

  2. #2
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    I don't think I've ever been to Lakeside Mall. It's up by M-59 in Macomb County isn't it? What lake is it near? And where is this Partridge Creek thing?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_Town View Post
    What do you think will happen to Lakeside mall since the introduction of the Mall at Partridge Creek?
    Since no one else will answer your question, here is my supposition:

    1. Nordstrom in PC will take some business from Macys, Sears, and Penneys in LM, but this will be offset by those who are attracted to two main shopping centers at one location.

    2. There may be some migration of the smaller stores as the more upscale move to PC, but the synergistic effect of two close together centers will make LM a more desirable place to open a store.

  4. #4
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    Lakeside Mall has already been harmed by Partridge Creek.

    A number of the more upscale retailers at Lakeside left when Partridge Creek opened.

    But I don't think Lakeside is in danger of becoming a Northland/Eastland dead/dying mall. An Oakland/Fairlane "so-so, and surviving" scenario sounds most likely.

    Non-upscale malls are in big trouble, because they tend to be older and poorly located, and their anchor stores, especially Sears and JCPenney, are in bad shape.

  5. #5
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    Default

    I do wonder what will happen to malls like Lakeside when you have hip, outdoor malls that replicate how we used to shop in downtowns.

    Where there other malls that were open but eventually covered, besides Eastland Mall, when that was the trend?

  6. #6
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    i never was a big fan of lakeside....to big and congested and i can't stand driving on hall rd. i like partridge overall and i can sneek in from romeo plank and avoid hall rd. all together.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by lukabottle View Post
    I do wonder what will happen to malls like Lakeside when you have hip, outdoor malls that replicate how we used to shop in downtowns.
    The majority of people shopping in malls never have experienced shopping downtown.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheels View Post
    The majority of people shopping in malls never have experienced shopping downtown.
    A couple of the last "shopping" areas downtown - Trapper's Alley and The RenCen, were not really any different than mall shopping.

    Ask how many of the tens of thousands of people who pour into "near" downtown every Saturday at Eastern Market shop at malls. Betcha that number is pretty damn high.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartock View Post
    Ask how many of the tens of thousands of people who pour into "near" downtown every Saturday at Eastern Market shop at malls. Betcha that number is pretty damn high.
    Is there anywhere in Metro Detroit to shop outside of a mall and a couple shops in downtown Birmingham? Everything there is either mall (including strip) or big box.

  10. #10
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    Lakeside will continue to hang on because (a) the area its located in is doing well, (b) it has the competitive advantage in winter, (c) it continues offer a number of key retail stores not available at Partridge Creek, and (d) it has the competitive advantage to serving Sterling Heights and western Macomb County, due to its location.

    1953

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheels View Post
    The majority of people shopping in malls never have experienced shopping downtown.
    Maybe because we're too young to have been their during the retail glory days of the 40s-60s downtown.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartock View Post
    A couple of the last "shopping" areas downtown - Trapper's Alley and The RenCen, were not really any different than mall shopping.
    Yes, they were different from the mall. The RenCen had a lot of upscale boutiques that weren't affordable to the common folks. Trapper's Alley had alot of specialty shops that catered more so to vistors than the homegrown folks. Neither had alot of shops to warrant regular customers. They were more like a destination shopping area.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by EastsideAl View Post
    What lake is it near?
    It is right next to Asphalt Lake. Duh.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bham1982 View Post
    Non-upscale malls are in big trouble, because they tend to be older and poorly located, and their anchor stores, especially Sears and JCPenney, are in bad shape.

    Why did developers build the "non-upscale" malls in poor locations in the first place?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettopalmetto View Post
    Why did developers build the "non-upscale" malls in poor locations in the first place?
    Well, for the most part, these malls were very well located when first opened.

    Northland & Eastland were dream locations in the 50's. They're bad locations in 2012.

  16. #16
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    If what you are looking for isn't on Hall Road then you don't need it. Every store imaginable is there within a few miles of each other. I just hate Hall Road.

  17. #17
    bartock Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
    Is there anywhere in Metro Detroit to shop outside of a mall and a couple shops in downtown Birmingham? Everything there is either mall (including strip) or big box.

    Thus, my point.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheels View Post
    The majority of people shopping in malls never have experienced shopping downtown.
    Perhaps shopping in downtown Detroit, but I think there are plenty of other downtowns with shopping districts. I know that my grand children, who never shopped in downtown Detroit, HAVE shopped in downtown Boulder, Denver and even Alpena, MI. Contrary to popular belief (on here) there are places with viable downtown areas.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bham1982 View Post
    Well, for the most part, these malls were very well located when first opened.

    Northland & Eastland were dream locations in the 50's. They're bad locations in 2012.
    And why do you suppose that is?

  20. #20
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    If you google Lakeside Mall you will see that there is a large lake to the SE of the mall. I doubt that it was there before the mall was built, but it is a lake, nonetheless

  21. #21
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    What is interesting is that everyone here, in varying degrees and for varying reasons, seems to detest Hall Road. I think this is very telling. The M-59 corridor has to be just about the worst planning ever - exurban, big boxes, all lined down miles and miles of a high speed freeway. No sidewalks, no walkability from the residential, which are all likewise big box subdivisions.
    I mean, who here thinks that is a good idea? How many people outside of the current generation of people already living there will want to live in such a place when those people move on, retire, or die? Especially since most of those came from the relative auto boom years of the 1990's. The auto companies are doing well but will never employ here at 1999 levels again. When those people retire there will be no jobs outside of Best Buy and the like, the vast majority of which you can't afford to live on.
    The vulgar ugliness and impracticality of M-59 are almost as bad as the fact that there were people STUPID ENOUGH who allowed such poor development to happen in the first place, nay, encouraged it. Plenty of reasons to leave Metro Detroit.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by poobert View Post
    What is interesting is that everyone here, in varying degrees and for varying reasons, seems to detest Hall Road. I think this is very telling. The M-59 corridor has to be just about the worst planning ever - exurban, big boxes, all lined down miles and miles of a high speed freeway. No sidewalks, no walkability from the residential, which are all likewise big box subdivisions.
    I mean, who here thinks that is a good idea? How many people outside of the current generation of people already living there will want to live in such a place when those people move on, retire, or die? Especially since most of those came from the relative auto boom years of the 1990's. The auto companies are doing well but will never employ here at 1999 levels again. When those people retire there will be no jobs outside of Best Buy and the like, the vast majority of which you can't afford to live on.
    The vulgar ugliness and impracticality of M-59 are almost as bad as the fact that there were people STUPID ENOUGH who allowed such poor development to happen in the first place, nay, encouraged it. Plenty of reasons to leave Metro Detroit.
    The irony here is that M-59 should have had the freeway continued from Mound Rd. on thru to I-94. That way all the folks who are only passing thru would not be comingling with the local retail traffic. But there is such an anti-freeway mindset on this forum, that had that happened, even then people would be complaining. I'm not sure having 3 lanes of service drive to handle local traffic would have been the best solution... but what is there right now is a "bumper car ride" roadway.

    And your retiree comment argument can be made for practically any location city suburban, exurban. My brother lives 1/2 mile from that stretch of M-59. His recently married son lives 2 miles from that roadway... so I would venture that we're talking about more than 1 generation of folks that want to live along this roadway already. So the demise of this area is so far into the future, that other areas will have failed long before this one does.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gistok View Post
    The irony here is that M-59 should have had the freeway continued from Mound Rd. on thru to I-94. That way all the folks who are only passing thru would not be comingling with the local retail traffic. But there is such an anti-freeway mindset on this forum, that had that happened, even then people would be complaining. I'm not sure having 3 lanes of service drive to handle local traffic would have been the best solution... but what is there right now is a "bumper car ride" roadway.

    And your retiree comment argument can be made for practically any location city suburban, exurban. My brother lives 1/2 mile from that stretch of M-59. His recently married son lives 2 miles from that roadway... so I would venture that we're talking about more than 1 generation of folks that want to live along this roadway already. So the demise of this area is so far into the future, that other areas will have failed long before this one does.
    No, that's impossible. No young people want to live anywhere other than downtown, in walkable, transit-oriented development. You are making this up and making lots of urbanists wince and cry.

  24. #24
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    Lakeside Mall is the primary mall that my family goes to. Oakland and Macomb are closer, but we've had less than desirable experiences there.

    My wife forgot to lock her car at Oakland Mall(shame on her), and someone was nice enough to go through the entire car looking for valuables but didn't find anything to their liking.

    I can tell you the mall is still alive in well, with some store turnover, but a vast majority of the space is filled.

    We go to Partidge Creek sometimes too, but we only do it when it's really nice outside. We've never gone there in the winter.
    Last edited by 48091; March-07-12 at 02:07 PM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hermod View Post
    the synergistic effect of two close together centers will make LM a more desirable place to open a store.
    If this is true why did Taubman sell Lakside when he opened Partidge Creek?

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